Hi
I built a website in dreamweaver, (on a mac). The pictures are aligned great, in Firefox and Safari.

When I open Explorer, the picture at the homepage is smaller and doesn't cover all the cell. it's in the middle and there is a lot of black around it.
How do I change that?

2. How do I make sure the size of the page stays fixed across browsers/computers? it seems to change from one computer to the next.

Thanks a bunch!
N.

the homepage is smaller and doesn't cover all the cell. it's in the middle and there is a lot of black around it.

without code i cant say about the problem still

in container tag add width/height property....hope it will help

How do I make sure the size of the page stays fixed across browsers/computers? it seems to change from one computer to the next.

you can make sure this by checking the appearance of page on different browser during each step of develop.

2. How do I make sure the size of the page stays fixed across browsers/computers? it seems to change from one computer to the next.

You don't.

What you want is impossible.

Since different browsers use different rendering methods, and different computers have different screen resolutions, this is an unsolvable problem. Anything done to fix one particular computer's view messes up other computers' views.

In addition, each user may have selected a different base font size for legibility.

The best you can do is make stuff small enough to fit on the lowest screen resolution you intend clients to be able to use, and put things at the top of the page. Then, at least all computers within your limit can display the page without scrolling.

One tip: Don't put both defined object sizes (height and width) and surrounding styles (margin, border, and padding) on the same block tag. Instead, nest two block tags, one with sizes, and the other with surrounding styles.

IE and FF render such combined-use tags in opposite orders of style nesting (IE puts the surrounding styles inside the sizes, FF puts the sizes inside the surrounding styles).

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.