Hi,

I want to know if it is possible for Internet Explorer to detect any action on the "Print Screen" key.

The website needs its content to be secured as much as possible. The clipboard is being cleared for every fraction of a second, until this web-application is closed.

There are applications like Snagit, Winsnap, etc.. which can take screen shots and store directly somewhere in the hard disk. For these applications, the Print Screen key in the keyboard is used as a hotkey.

I want to know if there is any way to detect the print screen keypress in IE?

Would appreciate any help or clue.

Thanks

You do realize that even if you did find out a way to do this that users could just disable javascript then take a screenshot(or do anything else that javascript is 'protecting') then re-enable javascript, right?

You do realize that even if you did find out a way to do this that users could just disable javascript then take a screenshot(or do anything else that javascript is 'protecting') then re-enable javascript, right?

Yes! I agree that the user has all the controls to his system and browser, so he can disable javascript anytime, he can also get the HTML source from his temporary files. But most of the users don't realize that the browser is acting different because javascript is enabled.

The page will go blank if the page loses focus. So, this will not allow the user to go thro the content if he opens the menu to disable javascript.

Moreover, there is no menu displayed in the browser for this site, it opens in a new window (supposed to be a full-screen, which is not possible in either FF or IE), where I have tried not to display the menu bar, status bar, address bar, and any toolbar.

In Firefox, whenever the Print Screen key is pressed, the page goes blank. I just want to know if there is any way we can listen to the Print Screen key from Internet Explorer.

Either using js or flash or any other way..

Is it possible for any web-application to scan the user's system processes and find out whether an application named SnagIt is running or not?

Not unless you have software running on their system. Even if you did I could probably guarantee that no one would be happy with that invasion of privacy.

I am totally sick of website creators trying to control the user's computer.

Such functions belong to the owner of the computer, NOT TO YOU!

If you don't want people printing your precious little pictures, don't publish them on the Internet.

You do not have the RIGHT to mess with someone else's computer. That includes the clipboard. It does not belong to you.

That person may have multiple windows open, where he is actively using the clipboard to move content between documents. He might even be doing this automatically under a script. If he pauses to check his email, and someone links him to your page, he is going to be really mad when his clipboard contents from the other process are disrupted. And if he gets someone's porn pictures in a customer's file (instead of his engine parts diagram), because you were messing with the clipboard, you might get slapped with a charge of computer invasion.

If your precious pictures are so valuable, then DON'T put them on a website. Suggestions on legal ways of doing what you want without breaking laws:

- If you are selling the photos, put low resolution versions on the site. Make sure you actually reduce the file size, not just the dimensions. Last week, I downloaded a thumbnail, and found the entire picture in the file - at 1200 px/in - I just had to enlarge it with a photo editor, reducing the resolution to 200 px/in in the process.

- If the user is paying for a download, I should think he should have the right to save a copy.

- If the person saved a copy for private use for research purposes, it is legal. The copyright law allows for scholarly research uses, and you have no right to prevent it.

- If the person downloads a picture for the sole purpose of preserving the ability to look at it after you remove it while changing your site, how is that hurting you?

- If you are worried that someone might use your pictures on other websites, post a warning that such use will be subject to litigation. If you find your picture on such a site, usually a notice of intent to sue will get it off there fast. I have already done that once, for an animation it took me hours to create.

- Realize that if the browser has downloaded your pictures to display them, they do not disappear from the Internet cache until he clears his cache or downloads something big enough to overwrite the memory. He can go to My Computer at any time and recover the picture from the cache. Also realize that you do not have the right to mess with his cache.

- Also, if he can see the URL of the picture (obtained in various ways), he can type in that URL and get the picture with no scripts running.

The Internet is designed for sharing information, not hiding it.

Thanks ShawnCplus, HenryGR and MidiMagic. I would better not do this and get myself into trouble.

Thanks a lot for your time. Better I would make a note that it is copyrighted!

Thank you very much!

Hi,

I want to know if it is possible for Internet Explorer to detect any action on the "Print Screen" key.

The website needs its content to be secured as much as possible. The clipboard is being cleared for every fraction of a second, until this web-application is closed.

There are applications like Snagit, Winsnap, etc.. which can take screen shots and store directly somewhere in the hard disk. For these applications, the Print Screen key in the keyboard is used as a hotkey.

I want to know if there is any way to detect the print screen keypress in IE?

Would appreciate any help or clue.

Thanks

BIOS hadles the printScreen event, - not even OS can intercept it. The only event that is reported to windows sys., is the "onkeyup" event (for as far as I remember) -but, than it is to late to take any action.

There is a topic on this issue here:
http://www.daniweb.com/forums/post645889.html#post645889
You might findit very hepful...

Thanks ShawnCplus, HenryGR and MidiMagic. I would better not do this and get myself into trouble.

Thanks a lot for your time. Better I would make a note that it is copyrighted!

Thank you very much!

Sorry, but what trouble were you talking about?

It is all a dogmatic empty propaganda. You have every right in the world to protect your property granted by most fundamental laws of human society everywhere in the world.

Go on, check my solution in the link provided. Than if you like we can talk about further enhancements there.

Is it possible for any web-application to scan the user's system processes and find out whether an application named SnagIt is running or not?

Now that's completely illegal!
I forgot to mention that: Protecting your property on the cost of harming others is completely illegal.
While protecting some materials on your page you don't have any legal rights to spoil or any how interrupt me while working in other applications that doesn't concern your protection.

Cheers.

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