i m very very new to asp.so i wanted t0 know difference bertween asp and asp.net. .net is better than php or asp. ?

Classic ASP runs of VBSCRIPT.

ASP.NET is a whole beast of its own and Visual Studio is needed to devleop these apps or pages


PHP to me is one of the most flexibil languages on the planet.

For webdesign php is the way to go for standlone apps...

C#.net is the way to go...

I develop all my software packages in .NET

I would say yes. It is an excellent reference point.

but keep it mind it is a whole new beast at the same time.

but knowing a good foundation of how classic ASP works you shouldn't have much of a transition issue.

what is the pc requirment to run .net program
my asp program is running on my pc i have xp pro . i have iis and asp working on that
the extension as a.asp
but if i try the code in .net with a.aspx it wont work. sorry for asking such silly question. but i m very new to this

The requirements for VIsual Studio can be found here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/productinfo/sysreqs/default.aspx

The requirement for running ANY visual studio standalone apps can be found here:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=262D25E3-F589-4842-8157-034D1E7CF3A3&displaylang=en

If you install VS on the webserver machine it will update the file extensions and you will be able to run aspx over a web browser but without the extension updates you will be unable to run them off the webserver correctly.

i wanted to know weather the sites on aspx or asp is more secured site than php sites?. i have seen banking sites some othere secured sites are in asp or asp.net or jsp.what are the other application of asp.net. sorry for asking so many question.

If you consider developing highly secure sites, use either JSP or .NET (asp.net). These are more like software development than web development, so that your site script will not known by web browser. If you have no background about Java, VB or C/C++ then they are quite complex for beginner.

P/S: Not single website is 100% secure...

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