I just signed up for Comcast for an apartment I'm renting in California. (Yes, I'm bicoastal now ... I own my place in NYC and I rent here in downtown Palo Alto.) Either way, I went to the Comcast store and got a little self-install kit that comes complete with coax, HDMI, cable wall huggers (or whatever you would call them), and even coax splitter. I thought it was so cute!! I'm not used to not having to wait a week for the cable guy. Better yet, I'm not used to the cable company thinking highly enough of its customers …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 8

While they have, in past years, enjoyed glorious recognitino such as the iconic ["Worst Company in America"](http://voices.washingtonpost.com/fasterforward/2010/04/comcast_wins_consumerist_worst.html) award, Comcast isn't letting its data-caps go away anytime soon, and while they have raised some of their caps in some markets, it's apparent the motive of the entire movement is far from bandwidth-related. Last month, Comcast stopped kicking around the idea of [data caps](http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/comcast-data-caps-hit-test-cities-range-from-300gb-to-600gb/) and instead pushed it into high gear, launching the capped services in various test markets, with limits ranging from 300GB to 600GB. The caps, designed to help quell bandwidth usage with their customers, seems to be suicidal from …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

Hey guys...having some serious trouble with configuring Exchange Server 2013 on Server 2012 for sending and receiving emails to and from the internet. Sending and receiving internally works great. However, Comcast blocks port 25 and running the MX record check over at DNSstuff.com reports that the MX record points to the mail server at the correct public IP address, but it cannot establish any SMTP connections. Trying to reconfigure my send and receive connectors EMC Powershell have failed using ports 587 and 465. Is there anyway that I can still use my .com domain and circumvent the blocked port? I …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 4

[ATTACH=RIGHT]18613[/ATTACH]The term Net Neutrality has been the subject of heavy discussion for the past several years. The freedom to go where and when we want to on the internet is about to slip away. Big telecoms and internet giants like AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, Time Warner and even Google have met with the government and came up with a set of rules that will allow them to regulate and prioritize what we see on the internet (to say the least). Yesterday Steve Wozniak, the engineer that co-founded Apple Computer, Inc. wrote an open letter the FCC imploring them to keep the …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+2 forum 1

Buried in all the Google Buzz hype today was a[URL="http://techcrunch.com/2010/02/10/google-fiber-optic-network-home/"] little story on TechCrunch[/URL] that Google is planning to offer [I]1 gigabit-per-second[/I], super-duper, high-speed fiber-optic cable in up to 50,000 homes in the US shortly. This is more significant to me than Google taking on Facebook. Think about this for a second, OK? In my town we have "high" speeds of around 8 megabits per second. The very fastest Comcast service available anywhere is 50 megabits per second. This is one GIGABIT per second. I mean, we are talking about unheard of speeds. Do I want it? Hell yes, I …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

I write a lot of about the battle among large technology corporations in this space and the importance of competitive checks and balances. Yet Comcast seems to be growing into a super power with control over the very pipes that provide many of us with internet access, but without any real competition and often with government support. Most places in this country get internet access through one or at most two providers. That kind of concentration of power is increasingly a threat to the very foundation of business and society, as so many of us use the internet on one …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

There has certainly been a lot FUD being spread around lately by the likes of [URL="http://www.comcast.com"]Comcast[/URL] about how [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peer-to-peer"]P2P[/URL] networks are filling up the Internet pipes. Just a couple of weeks ago, fellow Daniweb blogger, Davey Winder wrote (with tongue firmly in cheek), [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry2378.html"]The Internet is Full, please get off[/URL], for his InsideEdge blog. I asked Steve Rosenbaum, CEO of [URL="http://www.magnify.net"]Magnify.net[/URL], if he believed the internet was running out of capacity in an interview on Friday and his reaction was, “That’s just silly.” I’ve always felt if the internet were truly filling up, why not just build more capacity. Seems …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 5

I was watching an ad the other day for Panasonic where it showed people watching YouTube on a big flat screen TV in the living room. Yet most people don't watch content from the web on TV, probably because it still takes a technical leap that's simply too difficult for mass consumption. That got me thinking that many of us watch TV on our PC these days. My wife and I regularly watch shows on [URL="http://abc.go.com/"]ABC.com[/URL]. (I will sorely miss [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_on_Mars_(U.S._TV_series)"]Life on Mars[/URL], but check out [URL="http://abc.go.com/primetime/betteroffted/index?pn=index"]Better of Ted[/URL] if you haven't seen it). [URL="http://www.hulu.com/"]Hulu[/URL], which has a hilarious series …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

Is there hope for stocks in 2009? At all? A University of Iowa business professor things so, and he claims he has the data to prove it. It’s all about upside potential – and the fact that Wall Street has already baked a lot of the bad news into the trading mix. Says Todd Houge, assistant professor of finance at U. of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, “despite a long string of bad economic numbers in the past two months, most major stock indices are continuing to trend up from the lows they hit in November.” Houge makes his case …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

One of my favorite things about Twitter is how people can use it to live-blog conferences they're attending. Case in point: today, I've been watching [URL="http://twitter.com/thornley"]Joseph Thornley[/URL], provide live commentary from the Canadian Institute Conference on Social Media. I've been learning about how the City of Calgary manages social media tools for [URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQrh2M0vLG4"]employee recruitment[/URL] and retention. That's right, retention. Some nuggets from the conference: "Social media must be part of a [URL="http://twitter.com/thornley/statuses/933211780"]larger strategy[/URL] to get the most value from it. It should not stand isolated on its own." "If you have employees who waste time on Facebook, it's a [URL="http://twitter.com/thornley/statuses/933222208"]management …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

On a Friday afternoon before a holiday weekend, Comcast released its latest volley against its customer base, announcing a 250 GB monthly download limit. According to reports, after the first violation, you will get a message from your friends at Comcast warning you about your dastardly behavior (aka using the service you are paying for) and any subsequent violation of the limit would result in suspension of service for a year (or the less publicized punishment where you get sent to Dean Wormer and put on double-secret probation). This is a thinly-veiled continuation of Comcast's attack on P2P traffic. Earlier …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

Internet Broadband subscribers are being peeled away by cable television and there’s really not much the phone companies can do about it, analysts say. That could move a lot of money around on Wall Street. According to Leichtman Research Group, cable companies added 887,000 high-speed Internet subscribers in the 2nd quarter of 2008 – about twice the number of new subscribers added in the same quarter of 2007. The firm says that 76% of new subscribers went to cable companies – a telling sign. According to Leichtman, cable companies now have 35.3 million broadband customers, compared with 29.7 million at …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

The End.