News Story Dark Web Down?

The UK's National Crime Agency (NCA) has said that it has dealt a "major blow to dark web markets." In a [statement](http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/news/news-listings/483-international-law-enforcement-deals-major-blow-to-dark-web-markets) issued on the 7th November the NCA says that a coordinated operation between law enforcement agencies in Europe and the US has "targeted market places for illegal commodities on the dark web" and as part of this six people in the UK were arrested. Amongst those arrested in strikes closely coordinated with international partners in the US were the suspected administrators of Silk Road 2.0, the Tor accessed drugs and firearms market place. The NCA statement also claims …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+1 forum 7

American technology companies are by implication evil, and aiding terrorist groups such as Islamic State/ISIS according to a number of highly influential but terribly ill-informed Western players. Apple and Google have become the command and control networks of choice for terrorists and implementing full-device encryption by default will help Islamic State to plan future attacks, if we are to believe certain spy masters and career politicians. I use the term 'terribly ill-informed' wisely, and am aware that I will no doubt get plenty of flack from those who think the head of the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) or Director …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+4 forum 2

So, a bunch of US financial institutes have been hacked. Nothing new there, if we are being brutally honest. The newsworthyness in this particular case comes courtesy of one of those organisations apparently being none other than JP Morgan Chase. USA Today reported yesterday that a federal law enforcement official had told the media outlet, unofficially, that Russian hackers were behind the series of breaches which resulted in the loss of "sensitive data." JP Morgan Chase did not confirmed the accuracy of the report, but a spokesperson did tell USA Today that it uses "multiple layers of defense to counteract …

Member Avatar
+1 forum 0

The Onion Router, better known as the Tor Network, is often thought of as being the dark-side of the web. Not least as the anonymity provided by Tor meant that sites hosted on so-called hidden service servers were free to trade in just about anything from drugs and guns through to child pornography. In amongst the depravity and illegal excess, of course, were political activists and dissidents looking for an online safe haven in order to escape persecution, prosecution and potentially death. Revelations that the FBI would appear to have been behind the takedown of Freedom Hosting, apparently responsible for …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+2 forum 4

Did the FBI get the wrong man, or at least the wrong Dread Pirate Roberts (DPR), when it shut down the Silk Road darknet marketplace? Claims are being made that this is precisely what happened, and that Ross Ulbricht who was arrested took over as acting DPR from the real Silk Road founder before the FBI made its move. In a statement, reposted to Pastebin today under the title of '[Possible truths behind DPR and Silk Road](http://pastebin.com/5VkmGi0u)', someone calling themselves Elthemor Sagewood and claiming to be a well known Silk Road vendor says "In a court hearing today, Ulbricht's lawyer …

Member Avatar
+1 forum 0

Whether you travel on business or for pleasure, the chances are pretty high that you will make use of the Internet while abroad. If you are staying at a hotel then, given the high cost of international data roaming on most mobile networks, the chances are that you will make use of the Wi-Fi connection provided by the hotel. Unfortunately, for business travellers at least, the chances are increasingly high that doing so will put your data at risk. So much so, in fact, that the FBI has now issued an official advisory for Americans travelling abroad. ![dweb-fbi](/attachments/small/0/dweb-fbi.jpg "align-right") Why …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

The FBI took claims by new hacking group The WikiBoat that it was going to bring down the likes of Apple and Tesco last Friday at 4pm so seriously that it sent email warnings to those targeted. It's now Sunday morning, and the threatened DDoS attacks do not appear to have happened. So has The WikiBoat been sunk and is #OpNewSon a failure? ![dweb-wikiboat](/attachments/small/0/dweb-wikiboat.jpg) The answers would appear to be that it was never actually launched, but that doesn't mean that #OpNewSon is a failure or that this is the last we will hear from The WikiBoat in my opinion. …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+1 forum 3

An Internet Service Provider (ISP) has finally been given permission to reveal that he was the recipient of an National Security Letter (NSL) from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) six years ago, demanding information about his clients. Nicholas Merrill, president of the New York ISP Calyx, still can’t say on what specific date in February, 2004, he received the letter, nor the target of it from among his more than 200 clients, but he is now able to talk about the lawsuit that the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed on his behalf. He told [URL="http://www.democracynow.org/seo/2010/8/11/gagged_for_6_years_nick_merrill"]Democracy Now[/URL]! – incidentally, …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

[ATTACH=right]16367[/ATTACH]The Federal Bureau of Investigations and Wikipedia are going head to head. The great open-source compendium of human knowledge's crime? [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Bureau_of_Investigation"]Displaying the FBI seal[/URL]. The bureau sent a [URL="http://graphics8.nytimes.com/packages/pdf/us/20100803-wiki-LetterFromLarson.pdf"]letter to the Wikimedia Foundation[/URL] in July, asking that the seal be taken down from all Wikipedia pages within 14 days and threatening legal action. The letter seems to indicate that the FBI is worried about an army of teenagers, stay-at-home moms and seniors running around with fake FBI badges derived from the Wikipedia image. [QUOTE]Regulations governing authorizations to use the seals of Department of Justice components, including the FBI, are published …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 8

I recently argued '[URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story289730.html"]Why Goatse was right to disclose iPad data leak[/URL]' after it came to light that the FBI had started an investigation into the hacker group following the responsible disclosure of an iPad data leak caused by poor AT&T security measures. I said "The security researchers which discovered the vulnerability ensured that AT&T were not only informed, but that it had also closed the hole down, before going public with the news. So why are they, and not the dumbass security folk at AT&T responsible for not securing that data in the first place, the ones under investigation …

Member Avatar
+1 forum 0

iPad users in the USA have found themselves caught up in a security gaff which saw subscriber data of some 114,000 of them exposed for anyone to see. Subscriber data such as email addresses the Integrated Circuit Card ID that authenticates them on the AT&T network. The security researchers which discovered the vulnerability ensured that AT&T were not only informed, but that it had also closed the hole down, before going public with the news. So why are they, and not the dumbass security folk at AT&T responsible for not securing that data in the first place, the ones under …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+2 forum 4

The FBI has confirmed reports that it was forced to shut down it's external unclassified email network "as a precautionary measure" following the discovery of a virus infection. I am led to understand that the particular virus concerned has been identified by the FBI but this information has yet to find it's way in to the public domain. What most certainly has, however, is [URL="http://www.fbi.gov/pressrel/pressrel09/statement_052909.htm"]the admission[/URL] by the FBI itself that it was some 48 hours after identifying the issue and mitigating the risks before email traffic was 'largely restored' to the network which is used primarily for routine communications …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

According to [URL="http://www.news.com/8301-13578_3-9899151-38.html"]recent reports[/URL] the FBI has been using honey-trap hyperlinks which claim to lead to child pornography in order to entice offenders into clicking them. Last year, it seems, armed raids were carried out on homes in Nevada, New York and Pennsylvania as a direct result of such link clicking, even though the video files downloaded from the undercover government server contained no illegal images. It seems that the courts are happy to approve the practise, although others are less convinced of the morality if not the legality of the operation, quite apart from the technical hurdles it throws …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

The End.