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The FBI has confirmed reports that it was forced to shut down it's external unclassified email network "as a precautionary measure" following the discovery of a virus infection. I am led to understand that the particular virus concerned has been identified by the FBI but this information has yet to find it's way in to the public domain.

What most certainly has, however, is the admission by the FBI itself that it was some 48 hours after identifying the issue and mitigating the risks before email traffic was 'largely restored' to the network which is used primarily for routine communications and messages. The FBI told us that it is "important to note that the FBI's internal, classified network is where communications and e-mail about sensitive and investigative matters take place and was never affected."

Yet full functionality has yet to be restored to that unclassified network, in what must go down as a huge embarrassment for the Feds. An official FBI statement states that "Out of an abundance of caution, the FBI has temporarily self-imposed a limit on sending and receiving attachments on our external, unclassified network to give our technicians time to scan all the attachments that came into the e-mail system to make sure we have identified and mitigated all threats to the network."

We wonder, could it have been conficker? After all, it pretty much managed to sink the Royal Navy fleet comms system a few months back.

As Editorial Director and Managing Analyst with IT Security Thing I am putting more than two decades of consulting experience into providing opinionated insight regarding the security threat landscape for IT security professionals. As an Editorial Fellow with Dennis Publishing, I bring more than two decades of writing experience across the technology industry into publications such as Alphr, IT Pro and (in good old fashioned print) PC Pro. I also write for SC Magazine UK and Infosecurity, as well as The Times and Sunday Times newspapers. Along the way I have been honoured with a Technology Journalist of the Year award, and three Information Security Journalist of the Year awards. Most humbling, though, was the Enigma Award for 'lifetime contribution to IT security journalism' bestowed on me in 2011.

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Last Post by happygeek
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Obviously, this is part of the hype behind Obama's attempt to shutdown the Internet. We'll continue to see stories like the "Craigslist Killer" and read bills like H.R. 1966 (CyberBullying Act). There is a bigger picture here folks. The Internet is the last forum for free speech and the global elite are very angry to see the exposure of critical issues like Bilderberg, Obama's attempts to destroy our 2nd amendment (H.R. 2401) and Ron Paul's attempts to audit the Federal Reserve. They want to destroy this media so we have no alternative to Fox News and the other corporate controlled information channels.

Wake up and realize that there are forces at work that are aggressively attacking your first amendment.

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