According to the [Australian Federal Police](http://www.afp.gov.au/), it would appear that at least half a million credit cards 'down under' have been compromised and funds in excess of AUS $25 million (US $26 million) stolen. Although precise details are still coming in, it would seem likely that nothing more complicated than a bit of simple scanning for point of sale terminals which looked vulnerable was used to locate potential victims in the small retailer market rather than run the greater risk of detection by targeting banks or bigger business. Lessons learned from the Subway caper in the US last year no …

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How I would catalog police video. Play it fast forward and record that (just like movie pirates do) then post the results on the net. 4 hours of video down to 15 minutes. After that do a complete archive where the video is shown at fast forward or slow motion with the important parts being played forward and backward a number of times along with some text comments as to the action. The whole privacy concerns are a pathetic attempt to derail video recordings. Everybody is sexting these days. The only ones to benefit from restricting video are the perpetrators. …

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The UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has slapped the Greater Manchester Police force with a £150,000 fine (reduced to £120,000 for early payment) after a memory stick containing sensitive data about serious crimes was stolen from the home of a police officer. ![dweb-police](/attachments/small/0/dweb-police.jpg "align-right") The ICO has the power to levy such fines if an investigation determines that sensitive data has been put at risk courtesy of a lack of proper data protection being in place. In this particular case it must have been a very quick investigation, filed under the no-brainer category, seeing as the data was being stored …

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The UK-based [Surrey Police Force](http://www.surrey.police.uk/) has long since embraced Internet culture as being a way to help fight crime. It has an online crime reporting tool, active accounts on Facebook and Twitter, as well as a video channel on YouTube. But now it has moved into smartphone territory in order to entice members of the public into identifying suspected criminals by looking at CCTV mugshots using an app called Facewatch. ![dweb-facewatch](/attachments/small/0/dweb-facewatch.jpg "align-right") Available for free on the iPhone, Android and BlackBerry platforms as well as [on the web](http://www.facewatchid.co.uk), Facewatch lets the would be home-detective input their postcode and a distance …

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According to Facebook's chief security officer, Joe Sullivan, safety is the social networking site's top priority. Indeed, he [URL="http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=381246352130"]says[/URL] that his team are dedicated to "creating an environment where people can connect and share comfortably" and has revealed a redesigned Safety Centre which provides new safety resources for parents, educators, teens and members of the law enforcement community. However, there's one thing missing, a big red thing with the word [B]PANIC[/B] stamped on it. That's right, despite high profile campaigning by various child safety groups across the UK, Facebook still has no big red panic button. Sullivan insists that Facebook …

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My computer is completely locked up. I can't even get in Safe Mode. What can I do to bypass this, so I can delete it?

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All 43 police forces across England and Wales have now published crime maps on the Internet, according to the UK Home Office. This means that people can access details of crime in the areas they live in via the neighbourhood crime maps scheme. What a monumental waste of time and resources! As well as showing where crime is happening, helping to identify hotspots as it were, the maps also plot trends and provide a comparison with the rest of the country. The idea being, so says the Home Office, that the maps will "allow the public to see how local …

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It has been a long time coming, but a virus writer has finally been arrested by the Japanese authorities. According to security specialists [URL="http://www.sophos.com"]Sophos[/URL] law enforcement agencies in Kyoto, Japan, have arrested three men who stand accused of plotting to infect users of a popular P2P file-sharing network with a Trojan. The Trojan itself displays images of popular anime characters on-screen, all very lovely and Japanese, while at the same time deleting MP3 and movie files from the system: not so nice, obviously. The malware which was targeted at Winny P2P users has been identified as ‘Harada’ in various [URL="http://www.sophos.com/news/2008/01/harada.html"]media …

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It was only a matter of time, but the long arm of the British law has finally reached out to embrace the BlackBerry. 500 front line police officers in Bedfordshire, England have already been issued with BlackBerry devices to enable them to spend more time tackling crime and less time being chained to the desk at the police station. Another 500 are due to be equipped by early next year. The BlackBerry handsets give the British Bobbies direct access to all relevant back-end systems such as the Police National Computer and the Police National Legal Database, as well as the …

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The End.