I got a call from recently from someone claiming to be a Dell tech rep. He said my laptop was reporting multiple errors. Realizing immediately that this was a scam I let him continue while I started a Windows 7 Virtual Machine session. Because I had some free time I let him talk me through all the steps of how to view the "critical" errors in the event viewer, making sure to misunderstand him due to his accent. This required that he repeat himself frequently and phonetically spell out anything he wanted me to type. By the time he was …

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I just got off the phone. It was an interesting call. It was a technician from Microsoft calling to tell me that my computer had been sending a lot of fault data to Microsoft and that he was going to remote in to fix the problem. First he had me locate the `Windows` key on my keyboard. Then he had me press that plus R to open the Run dialog. Then he asked me to type in `cmd`. I did, then reported back that I now had a black window on my screen. He told me to type `assoc`. I …

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Global online cash provider [Ukash](http://www.ukash.com), founded in 2001 and with a presence in more than 50 countries across 6 continents, has warned users not to get scammed by a loan company con doing the rounds at the moment. Ukash works on a code basis, with the user buying a voucher in a shop or petrol station for example, and the unique 19 digit code it contains is used to pay for stuff anywhere online that accepts Ukash transactions (the codes can also load 'cash' into prepaid cards and e-wallets). ![8dacd82b5aee0265e8e9055ff922f33a](/attachments/small/0/8dacd82b5aee0265e8e9055ff922f33a.jpg "align-right") Reports are emerging that conmen claiming to represent 'The …

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Think of apps and you probably think of your smartphone. After all, Apple pretty much built an iPhone empire around the concept of apps and users of Android and Windows handsets are just as hooked. Truth be told though, and this 'Age of Apps' has spread far beyond the smartphone sphere. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the social media space. ![dweb-profilestalker](/attachments/small/0/dweb-profilestalker.jpg "align-right") Facebook is awash with apps, ranging from the useful to the useless. Many of them fall into the 'simply annoying' category, involving the distribution of games invites or high scores to the largely unimpressed and totally …

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With a billion members, active social circles and more than it's fair share of relative newbies to the world of online security, it should come as no surprise that Facebook continues to be the focus of much attention from those who would do you, your data and your bank balance harm. The latest scam to grab my attention, and unfortunately also lots of those with much less IT security know-how, promises to Facebook profile pages black rather than the default blue. ![dweb-fbblack](/attachments/small/0/dweb-fbblack.jpg "align-right") The distribution channel for this scam is the commonly used one of combining event invitations from Facebook …

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Just as your average Joe starts to 'get' the importance of online security, and that means using anti-virus software, so the bad guys start exploiting this new found understanding by flooding the Internet with fake AV products. [attach]16913[/attach]Security researchers at [URL="http://www.sophos.com"]SophosLabs have today identified a major new fake anti-virus software campaign[/URL] which is threatening to flood the Internet with malicious security products. The widespread spam campaign is designed purely with one goal: to get the unwary recipient to open HTML files attached to the messages which then redirect web browsers to hacked sites that come complete with a malicious iFrame …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]22213[/ATTACH]You may not be a big fan of Microsoft, but you wouldn't expect your computer to be held to ransom by the company would you? In recent months it has become quite commonplace, at least across Europe, for scammers posing as Microsoft technical support staff to 'cold call' people on their landlines and warn them that their computers have become infected with some nasty malware and offer to walk them through the solution to rid them of this imaginary infection, for a fee of course. They get you to visit a link that gives them control over your computer, and …

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Why has it taken six years for someone to take a contract out on my life? Or, more accurately, for a scammer to send me an email demanding payment of a bribe in order for him to cancel a supposed contract. The first hitman scam was spotted almost exactly six years ago in December 2006, and transported from email to the world of SMS mobile phone texting a couple of years later. Then it all went quiet for a couple of years, as far as I can tell, but the hitman scam is back and I got one. ![dweb-hitman](/attachments/small/0/dweb-hitman.jpg "align-right") …

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The 'World's Greatest Anti-Malware Software' is the spurious claim being made by Malwarebiter, which just so happens to sound an awful lot like Malwarebytes which could perhaps justifiably lay claim to that accolade. Take a look at this forum and you will see that Malwarebytes is a very valuable tool for discovering just what nasties are present on your computer, and for getting rid of them. Malwarebiter, on the other hand, is most certainly nothing of the kind. Malwarebiter, if you hadn't guessed by now, is a prime example of the Rogue Anti-Virus genre, identifying perfectly legitimate files as malware …

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Hello people! This afternoon I've recieved a phonecall on my main line, not a cell, from scammers (I think they're from Eastern Europe). I've recorded a part of this conversation in which the scammers were warning me about a nonexistant malware in my computer by having me show myself some error from the windows log. Apparently they noticed me not being a total nooblet and hung on me. As I said, I recorded that part and wanted to share it with you for your attention/entertainment. Enjoy, discuss and be aware. Fun starts somewhere near the end with the female caller. …

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I am getting rather fed up of seeing posts in the feeds of my Facebook Friends, including many who really should know better, advertising a supposed £175 value Tesco supermarket voucher giveaway. I say 'should know better' as the culprits have included technology journalists, computer magazine editors and IT consultants; all of whom must surely know that if it looks too good to be true then it's a scam. ![dweb-tescoscam](/attachments/small/0/dweb-tescoscam.jpg "align-right") And scam it quite patently is. Following on from a similar Tesco voucher scam at the end of last year, this new one adopts the same approach: in order …

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As a three times winner of the IT Security Journalist of the Year award in the UK, I am used to writing about all kinds of scams. Whilst most of them try and weasel their way into the bank accounts of the victim through purely online means, increasingly the bad guys are turning to 'old school' conman trickery via the telephone. The most common of these in recent years has probably been the rogue antivirus Microsoft support call (using remote access to your PC to install malware and then charge you to supposedly remove it) followed more recently by the …

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Probably the most common Olympic Games 2012 scam is that of unofficial ticket sales. No great surprise there, but the fact that Google appears to be in on the act might come as a shock to many. So what, exactly, is going on? [ATTACH=RIGHT]23779[/ATTACH]A little known law in the UK is, and I kid you not, the 'London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Act 2006' which, amongst other things, makes it a criminal offence to sell tickets for the Olympics without the explicit permission of the authorities running the Olympics 2012 event. Yet when the BBC investigated how easy it …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]22459[/ATTACH]Just how desperately are you looking for love? Unfortunately, for some the answer is all too often all too desperately; to the point where common sense leaps out of the window and is quickly followed by the bank balance. According to new research by the University of Leicester in the UK, hundreds of thousands of people have already fallen to what is being referred to as the online romance scam. In what is thought to be the first formal academic study of its kind, researchers at Leicester University have attempted to measure the true scale of online dating danger from …

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Facebook users have been making a lot of use of the new 'like' feature which allows users to link to webpages that they, well, like funnily enough. Not so funny when Facebook users are claiming to like a site called "101 Hottest Women in the World" which features an image of Jessica Alba. But don't be seduced... Not that I've got anything against the Hollywood actress and sex symbol, but I do have a dislike for clickjacking (or Likejacking if you prefer) and that's what is happening here. According to security experts at [URL="http://www.sophos.com/blogs/gc/g/2010/06/14/facebook-users-clickjacked-101-hottest-women-world/"]Sophos[/URL] as soon as anyone who is …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]22256[/ATTACH]England just scraped to a hard fought win against a physical and enthusiastic Argentina side in their opening match of the 2011 Rugby World Cup campaign in New Zealand. But while sports fans the world over get excited about how their country is performing in the initial pool group matches, some folk have other motives for clapping their hands with joy over the current wave of interest in Rugby Union: cyber-criminals are raking in the money with a whole host of Rugby World Cup 2011 scams. Nick Johnston, a senior software engineer with Symantec, [URL="http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/419-scammers-take-advantage-rugby-world-cup-fake-lottery"]has warned[/URL] that advance fee fraud …

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Viral videos are usually a great laugh, which is why they spread so quickly and the reason they get called viral in the first place. But the laughter soon stops when the bad guys use the lure of a viral video to launch a clickjacking attack. [attach]15852[/attach]Security researchers at Sophos are warning that scammers have struck on Facebook with a message that is spreading fast by proclaiming "I am part of the 98.0% of people that are NEVER gonna drink Coca Cola again after this HORRIFIC video" and which includes a link. What makes this particular attack stand out from …

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Stand up if you like paying your income tax. To all of you who have remained seated, which I will assume is indeed all of you, I have some more bad news: the bogus tax collectors want your money as well, and now they have botnets helping them. [attach]15770[/attach]According to a recent analysis by [URL="http://www.trusteer.com"]financial malware protection specialist Trusteer[/URL] of just one botnet, specific to the UK market, it was actively looking for [URL="https://online.hmrc.gov.uk"]login information for users of the HM Revenue & Customs[/URL] site where people can pay their income tax and VAT online. This botnet had details of more …

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New [URL="http://www.getsafeonline.org"]research carried out on behalf of Get Safe Online[/URL], a national Internet security awareness initiative backed by the UK Government and the Serious Organised Crime Agency, has revealed that 30 percent of Internet users are putting themselves at risk when they book a holiday online. [attach]15742[/attach]Get Safe Online and ABTA, the UK travel industry association, are now warning holidaymakers not to ignore basic online fraud-prevention measures when looking for a holiday bargain on the Web and suggesting that some might be handing over hard-earned cash for dream holidays that simply do not exist. The survey of 1000 British adults …

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If you get an email purporting to come from Twitter suggesting that you have forgotten your password, even though you know exactly what it is, you will not be alone. It would appear that around 55,000 people have already received these fake notifications which, as if you haven't guessed, are malicious link-filled spam. The [URL="http://www.websense.com/Content/ThreatSeeker.aspx"]Websense Security Labs ThreatSeeker Network[/URL] warns that the spam contains a link to a compromised site which will attempt to download a malicious executable named password.exe that is actually another of those rogue AV applications, this one being identified as Protection Center Safebrowser. The payload is …

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According to the latest State of Spam and Phishing [URL="http://eval.symantec.com/mktginfo/enterprise/other_resources/b-state_of_spam_and_phishing_report_02-2010.en-us.pdf"]report[/URL] from Symantec, a truly astonishing 92% of all adult phishing scams are being conducted across social networking sites. This coincides with a newly identified trend of adult oriented phishing whereby users are being tempted to enter personal credentials in exchange for the promise of free porn. A new trend using a very old premise, it would seem, as I recall the same 'free porn' promise being made over the years with scams ranging from [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story256128.html"]Trojan Porn Diallers[/URL] to drive by malware delivery. Indeed, the new trend is very similar to …

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First let's get something out of the way - I love the iPad. Every other blogger has shared their opinion so for me it's the eReader that does about ten times as much for only 150 per cent of the price. It's also the first games platform that's going to be able to [URL="http://recombu.com/news/ipad-board-games-apple-has-created-a-jumanji-platform_M11370.html"]cope with board games properly[/URL]. But I'm not writing about that - today is all about the opportunists and what they're up to with the device. A lot of people are searching for info on the iPad as you can imagine - not that there's any more …

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[URL="http://www.symantec.com"]Symantec[/URL] has published one of those rare things - a report that contains an actual surprise. It seems some 4 million people have fallen for Scareware in the last 12 months. I'm stunned. Not because people are installing fake antivirus systems. That's a shame but in some ways it's inevitable; people on their own will fall for scams. No, what alarms me is that the IT community (and if we include journalists and bloggers that's all of us) are doing so little to dissuade them. It wouldn't take much. An email sent to all remote workers reminding them that not …

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The other day I was on Facebook and a chat window popped up from a college friend of mine. [I]Bob: Hey there. How are u doing? Sharon: ok. you? Bob: Am not too good. Im in some kind of deep mess right now Sharon: uh oh. what happened?[/I] What "Bob" didn't know was that I was already suspicious of him by then. [I]Bob: Im stranded in London. I got mugged at a gun point last night![/I] Sure you did, "Bob." This is a classic example of the "I've been mugged!" scam that's been going around Facebook chat. A friend starts …

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It looks ever more likely that 2009 could indeed be the [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry3781.html"]year of the scam[/URL]. Symantec owned MessageLabs is warning that cases of advance fee [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry1198.html"]419 fraud[/URL], along with other financial scams, have spiked as we enter 2009. From December 22nd 2008, through into January 2009, the number of scams detected by MessageLabs more than doubled. The numbers show that this kind of fraud has increased from 4.2 percent to 10.2 percent during the period. That compares to just 3.1 percent during the same time last year. But that is just the start of it, according to MessageLabs which predicts …

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The [URL="http://www.e-victims.org"]E-Victims Organisation[/URL], a non-for-profit UK community interest company set up to benefit Internet users by assisting the victims of e-crime after the event, has released a top 10 Internet Scams of 2009 predictions list. Indeed, E-Victims.Org goes as far as to suggest that with new scams appearing almost daily, 2009 could reach new lows with numbers of scams reaching new highs. "We’ve seen honest traders go rogue due to financial pressures and we’ve seen desperate consumers taking more risks." says managing director Jennifer Perry, continuing "Rising unemployment and a global recession means we expect to see a huge increase …

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Security outfit MessageLabs today warns that as the credit crisis worsens so there has been a shift to the online arena for making money via spoofing banks for phishing scams. Between August and September this kind of phishing attack grew by 16 percent, but during September and October it has leapt up 103 percent. With seemingly never ending change prevailing in the global banking system, the crafty scammers are quick to take advantage of the merger and bailout feeding frenzy by targeting the likes of Bank of America, Wachovia, Chase Manhattan and Washington Mutual. On one day, the 16th October, …

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A hearty slap on the back must go to authorities in South Korea who have [URL="http://www.sophos.com/news/2008/03/lee-shin-ja.html"]arrested and charged[/URL] the 41 year old ex-CEO of an antivirus software company with distributing fake security scareware. Lee Shin-ja was formerly CEO with security outfit Media Port, and stands accused of distributing the 'free' bogus software to an astonishing 3.96 million users since 2005, with 1.26 million of them going on to buy the full product. Of course, they only reached for the wallet after being presented by fake security warnings in the free product which directed them to upgrade in order to clean …

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Research published by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) just before Christmas revealed that UK consumers are being conned to the tune of £3.5 billion every single year. The detailed analysis suggests that nearly half of the adult population of the UK has been targeted by a scam, and as many as one in fifteen, or 3.2 million people, fall victim to such fraud and lose an average of £850 each. Investment scams were most lucrative with an average pay-off of £5,660 per victim, followed by African 419 advance fee fraud on £5000, property investment scams at £4,240, holiday club …

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Are users becoming more wary of link clicking in email? Are they getting savvy to the tricks of the email phisher? Certainly there is some evidence that the security message is starting to get through to the masses, but not nearly quickly enough to turn the phishing tide in my opinion. Whatever the case, it appears that ID thieves need to find their own unique selling point in order to stand out in a sea of scam. Anti-virus specialist Sophos has uncovered one such attempt, where the phisher uses a new twist to con PayPal users into revealing credit card …

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The End.