I know that for every HTTP request the request carry some request header parameters like Accept, Accept-Languate etc.. I understand the general meaning of those parameters. But how server utilizes that information, that is not yet unclear. For example, The request header "Accept" header means "Content-Types that are acceptable". And for example I have set "Accept": "text/html". What server will do with that information? It understands that client only accepts "text or html" response only and hence it will avoid to send other type of responses for that request. Is it like that? Am I right? Please help me to …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

Hi, I have read something on IBM's site about exception specification and pointers to functions: void (*f)(); void (*g)(); void (*h)() throw (int); void i() { f = h; // h = g; This is an error. } IBM says: > The compiler allows the assignment f = h because f can throw any kind of exception. The compiler would not allow the assignment h = g because h can only throw objects of type int, while g can throw any kind of exception. But I tested the code in VC++, DEVC++ and CodeBlocks, no error anywhere. Any explanations? Thanks.

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

I'm a first timer with RPG-IV and am trying to write a D-spec. I don't know what the source type should be... tried PF, DSPF, D, DS.... I try to compile the file and it gives me an error involving DDS. Any advice would be great... if I knew what information I should give you I would but the only experience I've had in the past with structured programing is COBOL...

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 3

this is how 3d in html should have been done! displaying 3d models is the easy part...then using javascript, python, actionscript or java the edit the scene the tag "3dobject" denotes a single 3d file solely for viewing the tag "3dworld" denotes a list of 3d files within a world to be interactive and scripted <3dworld type=(rasterized/raytraced) id= name= class=> <3dobject src=(obj,colada,3ds) height= width= depth= /> </3dworld>

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

Get ready to rewrite your USB drivers. Again. Intel this morning released portions of an updated draft of the [URL=http://www.intel.com/technology/usb/spec.htm]Extended Host Controller Interface 3[/URL], the latest version (0.9) of the part of the USB specification that handles register-level communications between the operating system and the USB host controller. The new spec could support transfer speeds of 4.8 Gbps, 10 times faster than the theoretical maximum of 480 Mbps of the current USB 2.0 specification. Finalization is expected in 2009. Do we really need USB to go that fast? Few, if any, hard drives are capable of sustaining such transfer rates. …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 2

The End.