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Hello IT Pro's out there maybe you can help me with this. I want to know which field has more levels that can be achieved by an IT individual. I know that in Networking there are 3 levels namely CCNA, CCNP, and CCIE. But in programming, the way I see it, there's no sign of getting into a higher position or getting promoted, is there any?

Thanks for those who will respond. Lots of love for you smart people! Merry Christmas! :)

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Last Post by jwenting
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I think both fields are quite a different in terms of such a comparison but still from what I know the latter should be as follows: Trainee==>> Intermediate==>> Professional

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Hello IT Pro's out there maybe you can help me with this. I want to know which field has more levels that can be achieved by an IT individual. I know that in Networking there are 3 levels namely CCNA, CCNP, and CCIE. But in programming, the way I see it, there's no sign of getting into a higher position or getting promoted, is there any?

There are not standardized levels of programming ability, and there is no fixed knowledge set which learning will make somebody a good programmer. In programming there are plenty of ways of getting promoted, or you could just pull a bigger salary without getting promoted, simply by being better at what you do thus being more valuable. You might notice that people who might be called "programmers" that write code have salaries or incomes ranging from $50k to $300k in the U.S., and just to be clear, that's not counting entrepreneurs or people who work in finance, and $300k is not a real upper bound.

If you can say "I am good at foo" for values of foo that require a particular amount of intellegence or focus or that are particularly rare, and if you can give evidence that you are in fact good, then supply and demand will let you negotiate a high salary. And there's this tack you could take, that's a good article.

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Neither programming nor networking are games where you gain "levels" as you get experience.
And there's no "max level" programmer who can one-shot a noob by just looking at them.

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Aw, dang (as I re-holster my One-Shot Noob Killer). :)
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