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I am just curious as to how others would approach a professional situation in regards to pursuit and updates of a new, impending job:

In job-seeking I was raised as a child\ teenager to:

  1. Keep contacting the owner of a business feverishly until you secure the job.
  2. Keep contacting the owner of a business until you are told : "No, now GO AWAY!

I always choose the first option, but I feel that there must be a middle ground so one does not appear desperate and so one does not become a nuisance.

I have recently accepted a new job in the IT industry ( a non-programming position working remotely) but have yet to receive defined instruction, assignments, or even ongoing e-mails\ communications in regards to the job. I have been made aware (from the person that hired me) via one e-mail that there would be a lot going on last week with the business ( prepping for board meetings, etc) and that they would contact me within one day-- almost a week has passed now. Am I being impatient? I know I should just relax and wait as I know I have secured the job but I get worried and think perhaps something has changed and they have yet to tell me that my services will not be needed.

I had an 1.5-hour phone conversation with this person 2-weeks ago: it was great and we actually seemed to connect on many levels, interpersonally as well. It was good and assured me of my future with this company.

In any case, I would like to get hear the ideas of others as to how they would approach this. Should I contact them again this week or simply wait? I am very impatient at times as, in the case of this particular job, I am very excited and want to begin (it is a God-send position and an awesome offering full of massive potential for my career, I believe.)

Thank-you in advance, everyone. ;)

Kind Regards,
Matty D.

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Last Post by jbarry315
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    WaltP 2,905   10 Years Ago

    I completely agree. Call them every few days to get an update. As for: [LIST=1] [*]Keep contacting the owner of a business feverishly until you secure the job. [*]Keep contacting the owner of a business until you are told : "No, now GO AWAY![/LIST] This must also be tempered with … Read More

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Contact them, but do not be disappointed if they decided not to hire you, in IT industry, people rarely informs if they reject a candidate

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Someone employing either of the two tactics you describe would be rejected out of hand for most real jobs (maybe not for telemarketing and manning concession stands).
You're showing yourself as obnoxious.

Most likely you have indeed been rejected. While it would be good manners to notify you of that, most companies don't do so.
You might call them and ask, but don't badger them with constant phone calls and letters. They might just get a restraining order against you :)

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Someone employing either of the two tactics you describe would be rejected out of hand for most real jobs (maybe not for telemarketing and manning concession stands).
You're showing yourself as obnoxious.

Most likely you have indeed been rejected. While it would be good manners to notify you of that, most companies don't do so.
You might call them and ask, but don't badger them with constant phone calls and letters. They might just get a restraining order against you :)

Actually, I already am confirmed in the job. I was hired directly by the CEO. My question was in regards to contacting and re-contacting him about the details of the job (as he insisted I do should he be overtaken with other responsibilities last week which was indeed the case) not about whether I was hired or not. Details of specific upcoming work was already discussed and I was simply waiting for the go-ahead acommpanied with further instruction. I was really only inquiring through this post as to what is appropriate in the situation, not on how to go about getting a job at a "concession stand". :rolleyes: Once again, jwenting, you come through with a wonderful and encouraging demeanor.

I fear people on this forum do not pay attention to what is actually written but make assumptions in order to deliver there own opinions based on there personal, negative experiences, perhaps. Thanks for your reply. :confused:

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my answer still stands. You're on probation there for a period (depending on your contract and the local law that can be several months or longer).
Don't piss people off during that period or you're liable to be terminated with extreme prejudice.
And never piss off the big bosses or you find yourself in deadend jobs with no career opportunities.

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mattyd;
You are in a difficult position in which many will find themselves. You have the assurances of an officer of a company upon which you must rely; yet, you do not have any demonstrated substance with which you can back up those assurances. While what you have been assured of may be the absolute truth, things do change; and, things get put onto the back burner--- or forgotten... Or, as is the case in many business dealings today, some things not agreed to by those in charge of implementation can be left to "burn out" on their own... The tactic employed, translated, is something like "Ignore it--- It'll go away"...

While all this is possible, and your status is of great concern and a priority to you, the actions of the employer are not reflecting that. That leaves you, for all intents and purposes, still "unemployed". You are just attached to the strings of the employer.

SINCE this is the case, the best suggestion might center around remaining as engaging a person as the CEO first perceived you to be. This means remaining at the disposal of the company, and in contact with them. It might be wise to give them a call and ask whether the paperwork pertaining to your employment had gotten caught up in channels, or if you had perhaps missed some pre-employment requirement somewhere. It's best to be humble; and, it's not less-than-permissible to inquire if there was some misunderstanding on your part concerning the start-date for your employment or the channels you might yet need to go through to complete the employment entry process. It's not uncommon for those in the boardroom to take for granted that those in the human resources department will follow through on recommendations; and, it's also not uncommon for those in the human resources department to disregard some recommendations in favor of doing things by-the-policy-manual. That means, "your" job may have gone to the next in line.

From what you say, you have negotiated all things concerning this in the best of faith. That is admirable. It's the right thing to do. It is, however, not encumbent upon the employer, by any law, to negotiate with you in the same way. That means, nothing is in force to COMPEL them to be fair and truthful to you. The employer always negotiates from a point of advantage. Their focus is monetary--- not moral...

Don't get down over things, but be real. Stay in reasonable touch. Continue to be interested. Meet their criteria as they present it; and remember--- they're not infallible. Your paperwork might be sitting upon the desk of someone who hasn't been at work since some family emergency took them away from the desk. It's not beyond reason for you to ask the next person there to investigate your status, since you WERE hired by "X"<--(put name here) who is the CEO...

No employer these days, given that they are of an appreciable size, exists without certain "filters" which prevent over-zealous, or annoying job-seekers from gaining entry into the inner sanctum of their business. Many hire only through outside agencies; others have HR departments dedicated to the hiring process. If you gained what you've got through other channels, expect things to be handled in a way that's not necessarily as smooth as "normal". Hang in there as long as is prudent; then, should the time come when you absolutely need some sort of a definite answer, try to get one. At that point, you will have nothing at all to lose, and might come away with the peace of mind that accompanies the end of a task. You won't be left hanging any longer.

And, don't forget--- We're pullin' for ya....
Regards,
jb

Votes + Comments
Help with job advice--Thank-you so much\\ MattyD
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You are in a difficult position in which many will find themselves. You have the assurances of an officer of a company upon which you must rely; yet, you do not have any demonstrated substance with which you can back up those assurances. While what you have been assured of may be the absolute truth, things do change; and, things get put onto the back burner--- or forgotten... Or, as is the case in many business dealings today, some things not agreed to by those in charge of implementation can be left to "burn out" on their own... The tactic employed, translated, is something like "Ignore it--- It'll go away"...

Correct. I once had a verbal promise I'd be offered a job at a company which never went any further because the day after that a hiring stop was announced by someone higher up the chain of command than the person who'd made that promise.
An ex-colleague once had a promise from someone in a large company he'd get the job only to be overruled by HR who simply refused to send out the job offer because they had been left out of the initial recruitment loop (he'd been brought in by someone in the department rather than the 'official' recruitment process).
I've seen such things happen time and again.
A single call to clear up the mess can help (at least you'll find out what's happening there) but don't go calling them every hour on the hour until they get sick of you because that won't leave a good impression.

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jberry & jwenting: Thank-you for both your replies. This has given me a lot to consider. I appreciate it.

Kind Regards,
MattyD

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I completely agree. Call them every few days to get an update.
As for:

  1. Keep contacting the owner of a business feverishly until you secure the job.
  2. Keep contacting the owner of a business until you are told : "No, now GO AWAY!

This must also be tempered with good sense. Again, every few days... Every day may be too much, only once is too little. Just enough to show major interest and stick-to-it-iveness but, as has been said, don't be a stalker...

Votes + Comments
help with advice # Thank-you ___ MattyD
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I completely agree. Call them every few days to get an update.
As for:

  1. Keep contacting the owner of a business feverishly until you secure the job.
  2. Keep contacting the owner of a business until you are told : "No, now GO AWAY!

This must also be tempered with good sense. Again, every few days... Every day may be too much, only once is too little. Just enough to show major interest and stick-to-it-iveness but, as has been said, don't be a stalker...

As to points 1. and 2. (as noted above): It is not meant to indicate that there is or has ever been any level of harassment towards any prospecrtive employer; truth be known, I tend to be too laid-back about most things and am willing to give up easily in a lot of cases if I find something is not worth my time or energy or seems beneath me.

I am not desperate for a job as I already have a good-paying and stable job as a programmer-- this new job came out of the blue and seemed (seems, is) promising.

Update: I spoke with my contact the other day. I have been reassured that I am still to work for them and soon; there has been some other, business-related issues taking priority at this point. I understand this and am happy to be patient and prepare for this new job (which I have been doing over the last few weeks.)

I would not call someone or e-mail them everyday, non-stop-- believe me. But, I was raised to be persistant and I belive this is the key in many cases. But, employeement is symbiotic; I will not beg or grovel for any work like a serf. Why would I or should I? The jobs have always come to me eas. I was just extra-excited about this current , new job as it appears to be very much in my field of expertise and interest.

Thank-you for your reply and advice, WaltP... ;)

Regards,
Matty

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Thanks for the update, Matty. I felt fairly sure that, with what you'd described, some logical explanation would be forthcoming as a result of your efforts. It's always nice to get one of those, rather than a "canned" response. Score two points for the home team. You did good...
jb

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Thanks for the update, Matty. I felt fairly sure that, with what you'd described, some logical explanation would be forthcoming as a result of your efforts. It's always nice to get one of those, rather than a "canned" response. Score two points for the home team. You did good...
jb

Thank-you my friend. ;) You are very kind, well-spoken, and positive.

Kind Regards,
Matty

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