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Hi all,

I just joined the site today and hoping to get some quick answers if possible!

I'm putting in a small network for my company and just want to run through the configuration to see if it's possible. Any advice, suggestions or tips are greatly appreciated.

The office will have a total of 8 windows PC's. The patch panel is in the basement with 8 ports on it. Right now at our current office we only have 4 computers and we're using a 5 port wireless router. I was wondering if it's possible to use an 8 port switch at the patch panel but have the existing wireless router upstairs somewhere because the basement is solid concrete and won't generate a signal strong enough to reach the top floor. (It's a 3 story office) Basically, is it possible to have the switch at the patch panel and the wireless router upstairs somehow? The data cables have already been run and there are 8 RJ-45 jacks around the office. Please advise...

Regards,

M

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Last Post by DimaYasny
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To add further,

What does one do when they need 8 computers to share an Internet Connection but have only a 4 port Wireless Router? Can a switch be added to fix this? If so, how do I go about connecting that?

Thanks,

M

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... The office will have a total of 8 windows PC's. The patch panel is in the basement with 8 ports on it. Right now at our current office we only have 4 computers and we're using a 5 port wireless router. I was wondering if it's possible to use an 8 port switch at the patch panel but have the existing wireless router upstairs somewhere because the basement is solid concrete and won't generate a signal strong enough to reach the top floor. (It's a 3 story office) Basically, is it possible to have the switch at the patch panel and the wireless router upstairs somehow? The data cables have already been run and there are 8 RJ-45 jacks around the office. ...

Yes. Install a 16-port switch at the patch panel and connect all PCs and other network devices to the switch. Connect the upstream port to a new wire-only firewall/router. (This is easier than running a pair of cables to another floor just to save buying another toy I mean essential piece of equipment.)

Upstairs, install the wireless router somewhere to get RF to as much space as you can. Run two cables from the nearest RJ-45; one for the router and one for the PC that would have been connected to the wall jack but now must be connected to the router.

If you can configure the wireless unit to be a bridge (that is, not a router, not a gateway, not a firewall), do so; a bridge will let you use a single IP address range on your network (192.168.1.0 e.g.).

If you cannot configure the wireless unit as a bridge, configure it as a router with the firewall disabled. The wireless unit's WAN IP address will fit with your first, main, network (192.168.1.0 e.g.); its LAN IP address will fit a different network (192.168.2.0), and all systems connecting to it will be on the different network.

I essentially did this at my church. The cable modem is in location A, as is the 24-port 10/100/1000 switch. A Linksys WRT54GC (compact) wireless router is in location B. I ran two cables to it to keep it logically placed between the cable modem and the switch; it is the primary firewall between the internal network and the internet.

A Linksys WRT54G wireless router is in location C. I loaded DD-WRT firmware on it for extra features and for greater reliability. A single cable connects it to the 24-port switch in location A. It is running as a bridge, so as to use only one network address and one DHCP server in the church.

Another WRT54G is in location D, running DD-WRT firmware. It is configured as a wireless client bridge that connects to the WRT54G in location C. It has a PC connected via wire to it. When they need to use that PC, they turn both on and the PC is magically connected to the network. And I didn't have to string a cable to it.

This whole network uses a single 192.168.X.0 network. A single DHCP server on a Win2003 server feeds them all. All systems can see the internet, the server, and each other. Wireless is generally available in both areas, but can be dicey with older laptops that have questionable antennae: one LT on a desk might see one bar of signal, whilst another LT in that same spot might see five bars of signal.

If you want configuration details, it'll take a while. I installed it a couple years ago and haven't had to muck with it much since. In other words, I've forgotten the details of how I made it work. :) But I can get it, given some time.

While you are installing all this, be sure to put good A/C filters in place to keep surges and spikes out of the equipment.

N

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if there's no upstream socket at the hub/switch, you can connect it with a crossover cable to the router.

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