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First off.. I want to say that I cannot believe that it took me this long to find such a cool site that is so well put together and informative.

I am fairly n00bish to everthing PC with only a couple of years experience under my belt. I have taken classes on networking and have a couple of MCP's (but doesn't everyone?) I have been fascinated with programming,networking, and security - but they are all in thier own little world.. but so far I have invested more time and effort into C++ than anything else and I keep coming back. I currently work in a large government ran facility but the work is just not that interesting- nor does it pay that well (IT related) and the good jobs always seem to go to a buddy or someone with 8029384903 years experience.. I have a few books and have dl'd a couple of compilers. I guess this is where the n00b questions come in..
What is the most common, widely used software that is also in the real world? (as far as C,C++ or C# is concnerned). I enjoy all things computer - but I just have no sense of direction...maybe C++ or programming isn't right for me..
Any suggestions would be great.. TIA.
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Last Post by clartsonly
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Hi. First of all, thank you so much for your comments about the site. I'm a bit confused what you mean by the most widely used software. Are you referring to development tools such as Microsoft Visual Studio .NET? Do you want to know which programming language to go with? Or what are some small programs you can start off writing?

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the software that is eesential for hardcore c++ is Microsoft Visual C++. It would be hard to find a major programming firm or company without it. As for programming, its not for everyone, it gets really frustrating at times and is fairly monotonous. the choice of whether or not its for you, is one that only you can make!

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Hi everyone,
why don't you have a look at my other response in the c++ section entitled c++ dying a slow death. On the most common languages i would recommend you to learn basic, C# and java(very good alternative to c++)

Yours Sincerely

Richard West

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Hi everyone,
why don't you have a look at my other response in the c++ section entitled c++ dying a slow death. On the most common languages i would recommend you to learn basic, C# and java(very good alternative to c++)

Yours Sincerely

Richard West

I would disagree with this, it is something covered in several other threads about paths to programming and stuff. Basic is a dead language, learning to program by using it is a waste of time, I would recommend learning using a language that at least still has some use in real world environments, ie, perl, c, visual basic (if you must), pascal (although it is mostly dead, delphi as a better alternative).

I don't think C++ will ever die completely, and I don't think Java will replace it, both language have their place and will be required even if it is just to maintain old applications, if C++ is the language you want to learn I recommend getting a couple of good books of the top of my head the best I have found are, Practical C++ Programming, published by O'Reilly and The C++ Programming Language, follow a few of the examples in the books, and then play, figure out something you would like to do and do it. Also if you are just beginning there is no need to drop hundreds of dollars on visual c++ I would recommended bloodshed dev-c++ for windows or even better g++ for unix environments.

HTH

Ben

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Hi. First of all, thank you so much for your comments about the site. I'm a bit confused what you mean by the most widely used software. Are you referring to development tools such as Microsoft Visual Studio .NET? Do you want to know which programming language to go with? Or what are some small programs you can start off writing?

.. when I said software I should have said "language".. kinda like the question you answered in the other thread that I was in..I have been reading and messing with C++ quite a bit lately.. I have made a few really simple programs - it seems like I have to read each section over and over to get the hang of it.. but so far so good. Right now the "if" statements are slowin' me down..

I would recommend learning using a language that at least still has some use in real world environments, ie, perl, c, visual basic (if you must), pascal (although it is mostly dead, delphi as a better alternative).
I don't think C++ will ever die completely, and I don't think Java will replace it, both language have their place and will be required even if it is just to maintain old applications, if C++ is the language you want to learn I recommend getting a couple of good books of the top of my head the best I have found are, Practical C++ Programming, published by O'Reilly and The C++ Programming Language, follow a few of the examples in the books, and then play, figure out something you would like to do and do it. Also if you are just beginning there is no need to drop hundreds of dollars on visual c++ I would recommended bloodshed dev-c++ for windows or even better g++ for unix environments.

I am using the Dev-C++, and I must say that it is pretty easy even for a complete beginner like me. I will continue on with this book I have and hopefully complete it soon and maybe move on to VB.

the software that is eesential for hardcore c++ is Microsoft Visual C++. It would be hard to find a major programming firm or company without it. As for programming, its not for everyone, it gets really frustrating at times and is fairly monotonous. the choice of whether or not its for you, is one that only you can make!

I can see how programming can get really frustrating.. but it's the challenge that I like. I want to "learn" it even if I never use it in a job. You never know when you will need it....

The reason I picked C++ in the first place is - it seemed every time I looked at IT jobs in the paper or online... they were wanting C++ experience... Then I started noticing VB... every time without fail.
Right now I have no experience with any language so it is hard for me to tell the difference betweens everyones bias or a legitimate reason on why to use or not to use a certain language... BUT that is the part I like.. I want to hear everyones opinions so that I know what to look for...

Sorry for the book.. and thanks for the help guys .. and girls :D

Brooks

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The thing about programming is that it is 30% coding and 70% socializing with the person/group who wants something done. Think of a carpenter building a house. The tough part of the job is NOT deciding which hammer to use; its reading the blueprint. A good carpenter can see issues and discuss them with the owner/architect, and use the right tool for the job. The tool part comes with experience, and you can use the 'perfect' hammer or not, and with a good carpenter it doesn't matter; they can pick up almost any hammer and do a good job. They also know which hammer is 'right' for a job.

So, pick ANY language. You see ads for Visual Basic, so fine, use that. C++? use that. The language is the EASY PART. The hard part is figuring out what the customer needs and wants.

In my experience, customers have their preferred languages, and you adapt to them. The interesting/fun/hard part is figuring out what to DO with the language.

Remember, if you chose programming as a career, you can have FOURTY YEARS of doing it, so make it fun! Don't waste 2,000 hours a year on something that isn't fun.

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Oh, yes, and by the way, in my experience people are worth spending time with, machines are worth making money on. Don't confuse making money with fun. Humans == fun, machines == money.

Never never never turn down a chance to spend time with someone you love because a machine needs you.

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The thing about programming is that it is 30% coding and 70% socializing with the person/group who wants something done. Think of a carpenter building a house. The tough part of the job is NOT deciding which hammer to use; its reading the blueprint. A good carpenter can see issues and discuss them with the owner/architect, and use the right tool for the job. The tool part comes with experience, and you can use the 'perfect' hammer or not, and with a good carpenter it doesn't matter; they can pick up almost any hammer and do a good job. They also know which hammer is 'right' for a job.

So, pick ANY language. You see ads for Visual Basic, so fine, use that. C++? use that. The language is the EASY PART. The hard part is figuring out what the customer needs and wants.

In my experience, customers have their preferred languages, and you adapt to them. The interesting/fun/hard part is figuring out what to DO with the language.

Remember, if you chose programming as a career, you can have FOURTY YEARS of doing it, so make it fun! Don't waste 2,000 hours a year on something that isn't fun.

I can definitely relate to what you mean here.. I am "wasting" alot of time where I am at now.. and it sucks. That is also part of the reason I have decided to get into programming... I dont really care to much for the networking side of it (kinda like what I am doing now).
I do like problem solving and trying to make someone elses ideas work.. that is fun to me.. and I like to see there excitement/appreciation when one of my creations work..

Oh, yes, and by the way, in my experience people are worth spending time with, machines are worth making money on. Don't confuse making money with fun. Humans == fun, machines == money.

I like fun.. but I like money too :D

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Yeah, we ALL like making money. Heck, even Bill Gates still shows up for work.

Still, when your girlfriend/boyfriend says "lets go out tonight and have fun" don't say "nah, I'm gonna code up some sort routines."

Yes, show up for work, yes put in enough hours to do an honest day's work and get paid for it (heck, we get WELL paid for this work). Work hard. When you're close to shipping, work long hours and weekends to get it out the door.

But, like that tired old saying goes, when you are on your deathbed, you won't say "Damn, if only I spent more time at work."

Your dad would like to get a phone call from you.
Your mom would like to fuss over you.
Your kids want to play with you.
Your spouse/friend wants to try out some new lube.
Whatever.

Machines can be fun, but as you get older you remember the great times you had with people, not those long (and yes sometimes fun) hours spent with machines.

Sorry, I'm not trying to sermonize here, but now that I'm gettin' old I wish I'd spent more time with people that are gone now.

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>pliz clarify this:is C++ dying or what coz this is the lang. am specialising in.
No, C++ is not dying and anyone who says it is is very confused.

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I totally agree with your comments about this site.

If you are looking at money you need to specialize in something and make yourself "required". It is quite difficult to walk out of 2 years experience and fetch 50K-60K. I taught myself vc6++, and ATL for writing webserver components, they are by far my prefered method of programming, partly because I am the only one in the company who understands what I am doing, and they are efficient I have done some webservices and mini sites with .NET, and think that basically anyone can do this. when looking at c++ jobs they don't seem that well paid, but if you get "financial" experience behind you, it doubles your high paid opportunities. you have to remember that it is the experience of programming methods and skills which makes the difference a new language is just different syntax.

perhaps you should look into DBA, they are a lot more specialized and where a company may have 20 developers perhaps only 2 DBA's, making them a little more valuable, and if one leaves you are the only one left. Of course you will drop most of your developing tasks, which is a shame if you enjoy it.

Good Luck - And make sure you pick a job you enjoy over a couple extra thousand pounds, else you will become like the littlest hobo and never stay long enough in the same company to make a career out of it.

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>pliz clarify this:is C++ dying or what coz this is the lang. am specialising in.
No, C++ is not dying and anyone who says it is is very confused.

You have to remember you can virtually do anything possible in windows using c++, one comment I will have about it is, do expect there to be a correct standard, read several approaches from books and create your own prefered methods as there are so many different ways to get to the final result.

and also get a book on ATL and write some nifty little com dll's, then you can encapsulate all of the business logic in a tiny little binary, and the trainee VB, and Web Developers who don't understand databases can knock out their apps in no time at all. ;)

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