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Hello everyone..

I am from Puerto Rico... I'm 18 years old... and I have some kind of a doubt, I'm about to enter to college, and I'm having a terrible doubt in wich major I should be going...

It's a Computer Science vs Computerr Engineering (Software Engineering) kind of a thing...

I've been doing some research from some time now about these two majors, but the more I research the more confused I get.

The two majors in the college I'm planning to go are very very similar *very* (Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico -- www.pupr.edu)

I know what Computer Scientist are about, they tend to work a lot on Compilers, theory, etc, but the thing is Software Engineering it's pretty similar, I even thought on taking the Computer Engineering program and take some of the best integral parts of the Computer Science program as electives.. By now, the only difference I have seen with the program in the college are the Electronics, Microprocesors, circuits classes... from that, nothing is really _that_ different.

I have taken several tests about wich career might be right for me, they all say the same thing (Systems Analist [computer science], engineering, programming, and a couple more)

I was hoping that some people here that are studying Computer Science and if I'm lucky enough some studying Computer Engineering could tell me the real deal about these two.

Oh another thing... I'm not a fan of titles, infact if it were up to me I wouldn't been paying attention to titles, but here in Puerto Rico it doesn't work that way, here they are kind of stupid... some are even so stupid that they'd rather have titles than skills.. shame... Anyway, I just want to have a happy life with the Career I could have with the studies I accomplish, an economical part would certainly help... but money is not everything in life, I want to be happy with my job aswell, perhaps in software engineer, developer, or whatever I end up doing...

have a nice day,
bye!.. ;)

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Last Post by sit_lawrence
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hi everyone,
here's a strange story for you is that i was once in the same dilemma as you are in now. One of my good friends once told me learning to do computer science can be picked up from books (as what i know from people whom have taken this course) is mainly about programming languages but computer engineering is basically learning about the computer main architecture and about its main hardware systems and tasks. As for myself end of the day i decided to go heavily into robotics and artificial intelligence which until today i still enjoy. Basically what i am saying if you want to be a programmer go into computer science but if you want something more hardcore go to computer engineering or maybe even electronics engineering. Well anyway this is what i think.

Hope you make the right choice and don't make any hasty choices as these mistakes last a lifetime

Richard West

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Hmm, computer science is a lot more than programming. There is a lot of math and theory behind it. The main differences between computer science and computer engineering are that comp. engineering also includes more digital circuitry and electrical engineering than comp. sci. does.

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So, basicly... if I take the Computer Engineering course, I will get more or less practicly the same basis in programming that Computer Science have? (that's of course, if I take some CS electives?)... but at the same time I will get a good part of electronics etc?

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Computer Science

Software Engineering

Computer Engineering

Electronic Engineering


Are all COMPLETELY different majors. They all have some of the same classes though.

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My impression is that someone with the computer science degree would be able to perform the same tasks as the one with the MIS or software engineering degree, but not vice-versa. I see CS as being more theoretical and rigorous, and more beneficial in the long run.

For example, once one has mastered the theory of languages, how hard would it be for them to pick up this or that new language?

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My impression is that someone with the computer science degree would be able to perform the same tasks as the one with the MIS or software engineering degree, but not vice-versa. I see CS as being more theoretical and rigorous, and more beneficial in the long run.

?

Well, these majors all have there place. A person with a CS degree or a Soft. Engineering Degree can BOTH do the same things. The curriculum for both majors are almost identical. MIS and CIS, have there own place too. However you saying,

once one has mastered the theory of languages, how hard would it be for them to pick up this or that new language

"

If you think you will be able to "master" the theory of language with just a BS degree in CS, you will be sadly mistakened.

On the other hand, CS is a good way to get a head start.

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...
If you think you will be able to "master" the theory of language with just a BS degree in CS, you will be sadly mistakened...

Please elaborate. I found the comparative languages text to have a pretty good coverage of some different approaches--not sad quite yet.

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Please elaborate. I found the comparative languages text to have a pretty good coverage of some different approaches--not sad quite yet.

All I am saying, if you want to " MASTER " the theory of computing, I would suggest completeing a Doctoral Program in Computer Science or Software Engineering.
At the BS level, you learn an overview of theortitcal divisions of computing and, you will have a great understanding of computing, however, you will be quite far from actually "MASTERING" it.

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My original choice of words was regrettably ambiguous. My college has a comparative languages course that does enough generalizing that it ought to take the edge off of learning a new language. Though I have used at least a dozen languages over the years, the text for the course is providing insight and tying things together nicely for me.

There is also an Introduction to the Theory of Computing course that covers finite state machines, turing machines, computability, NP completeness and so forth. I am sure that there is much more to the field than is contained in this course, and it would be graduate level to move beyond it.

I continue to maintain that the more generalized and theoretic coursework of the CS degree is more helpful than the more practical code a bunch of programs in the most popular language approach. This a short-term versus long-term kind of thought.

A co-worker took mechanical engineering at MIT and mentioned that while the engineering students learned C++, the computer science majors tended to think of a programming language as a very plastic thing to be debated or created rather than just learned. I am only remembering my impressions of his description rather than the specifics, but knew at that moment that I wanted to be coming from that place as well.

MIT uses the Wizard book for an introductory programming course--I think, and it is different from anything at my school, so I am not conversant in what its exact insights are.

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Computer Science also includes lots of digital circutry and electrical engineering stuff. I am an undergrad right now majoring in computer science, and doing reaserch in the area of computer architecture (which is ALL digital/analog hardware).

I will be graduating this spring and will be going to graduate school, where I will be doing my reaserch full time. Computer Science is NOT just programming as many people think.

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Im personally doing a BS in CS then, after maybe five years of industry experience I might go back for a masters in software engineering. I don't know about the whole PHD thing though, probably won't attempt to get it until im really far out there in my career.

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Both B.Sc Computer Science and B.Eng in Computer Engineering are the same.

Just that B.Eng in Computer Engineering study 2 year in Electrical Engineering and 2 year in Computer Science.

Both course are overlapping in most country.
Both course enable you to become Software Engineer...

However, one of the best Software Engineer i know, come from law background.

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