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Hi there.
I have vmware workstation , a program that simulates oper. systems. So I virtually installed windows xp with this program( it creates a 10 GB folder) and i virtually run windows xp through my computer ( which also runs in windows xp :) )

So why did I do that?
Let's say I have a trial app. I install it there and after the trial period i destroy the folder with the virtual win xp. Then I virtually install win xp and do this again and again and I can have the app forever.

Well is this legal??

P.S. in case you find this post silly ( as well as me ;) ), i'm just respecting the effort of the maker of any program and don't want to 'steal' him....

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Last Post by TheGathering
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Well, the answer is very straightforward - no.

You are intentionally circumventing the trial period policy. How can you possibly wonder if this was intended to be ok? You are obviously NOT respecting the effort of the maker and DO want to steal the software, otherwise you would pay for the software as intended after the trial period expired.

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Ok , thanks for the answer, you're right.

Till now i use mainly cracked apps and i thought that using shareware this way would be an improvement.

Although i know i'm wrong many justificatons bumb into my head.

Like:
1. law about copyright in my country is very loose.
2. i can't afford to buy them
3. every colleague i know uses and learns cracked-top-rated apps
4. i must compete with them and succeed somehow on cs ( find a job)
and many others.

P.S. i'm not waiting any answer about my justifications. I should write only the first sentence and keep the other in my mind...

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1) your law doesn't apply if the contract (which you went into by installing the software) was written under another jurisdiction
2) there are always cheaper alternatives. You get what you pay for of course
3) if those colleagues commit suicide, will you follow their example? So why do you follow their example when they steal?
4) if they're colleagues, you're not competitors. If they are competitors gather evidence and get them convicted for their criminal activities, destroying them in the process and getting rid of the competition

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Well, the answer is very straightforward - no.

You are intentionally circumventing the trial period policy. How can you possibly wonder if this was intended to be ok? You are obviously NOT respecting the effort of the maker and DO want to steal the software, otherwise you would pay for the software as intended after the trial period expired.

lol

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Ok , thanks for the answer, you're right.

Till now i use mainly cracked apps and i thought that using shareware this way would be an improvement.

Although i know i'm wrong many justificatons bumb into my head.

Like:
1. law about copyright in my country is very loose.
2. i can't afford to buy them
3. every colleague i know uses and learns cracked-top-rated apps
4. i must compete with them and succeed somehow on cs ( find a job)
and many others.

P.S. i'm not waiting any answer about my justifications. I should write only the first sentence and keep the other in my mind...

What you do is what you do. Your sense of morals should be governing the work you do, not your peers.

Just keep in mind: http://directory.fsf.org/

The GNU Free Software Directory has many useful apps to compete with commercial software. Some tools such as Gimp, Open Office, and Blender are commercial grade and free (so you don't get what you pay for, you get something better than what you have to pay for for free).

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