I am going to school for Network Administration. I have an assignment to talk to a Network Administrator and answer some question about his company's network. Could someone please address these questions? I do not personally know any Network Administrators. I don't need your company's name. Thanks in advance.

If you feel like answering a couple please do so. Even if you are not a Network Admin.

1. What services are provided?
2. What servers are there?
3. What cabling is used?
4. How is the server room set up?
5. How do they connect to the Internet?
6. How do they connect to other locations if their company has a WAN?
7. What specialized software is used if any?
8. What upgrades would they like to make?
9. How does this network support the unique business interests of this company?

I am going to school for Network Administration. I have an assignment to talk to a Network Administrator and answer some question about his company's network. Could someone please address these questions? I do not personally know any Network Administrators. I don't need your company's name. Thanks in advance.

If you feel like answering a couple please do so. Even if you are not a Network Admin.

1. What services are provided?
2. What servers are there?
3. What cabling is used?
4. How is the server room set up?
5. How do they connect to the Internet?
6. How do they connect to other locations if their company has a WAN?
7. What specialized software is used if any?
8. What upgrades would they like to make?
9. How does this network support the unique business interests of this company?

1. As a network administrator, my main tasks consist of the following: monitor and maintain network performance and security, delete and modify user permissions, administer active directory, develop standards, and above all, reasearch and study new technologies that could increase the overall work efficiency of the corporation.

2. The majority of our servers are Dell PowerEdges; we just recently decided to standardize our entire company to Dell workstations and servers. We chose Dell for a number of reasons, but to keep it short, the decision was made mainly due to the unbeatable service contracts. All our (live) servers have Dell Enterprise Gold Support which guarantees (24x7x365) an on-site technician, with parts in hand, in less than 4 hours. Each branch has a single (live) Dell PowerEdge, and HQ has 4 Dell PowerEdges; two are live, two are failover. Of the 8 mentioned servers, 6 are running Windows 2003 R2 (32-bit) and two are running Windows 2003 (64-bit) with Exchange 2007. We are also in the process of installing ShoreTel VoIP servers at all the branches. In addition to these we're working on implementing an HP (:() MySQL server along with a Dell Linux server. Lastly, we have a Dell PowerEdge (not-live) soley for testing new softwares before implementation.

3. The majority of the company runs on Cat5e on the LAN; We just recently finished construction on a new building for one of our branches, and Cat6 was ran there.

4. The server room at HQ is setup similarly to most datacenters. We have a 6ft Dell rack which contains all of our Dell/ShoreTel servers and switches, a router, a firewall, a barracuda spyware filter, monitor/mouse/keyboard, and our UPS. This rack connects to our LAN via a patchpannel on the wall next to it and to the WAN via a T1 jack which is located on the adjacent wall as well.

5. HQ has two T1 lines tied together for internet. The internet is then distributed to the 4 branches via PPTP T1 lines.

6. We connect to our branch offices via PPTP T1 lines from HQ.

7. The two most 'specialized' pieces of software that come to mind are Exchange 2007 and Double Take. Exchange 2007 converges all data communications throughout the corporation. Double Take is installed on the two live PowerEdge servers and the two fail-over PowerEdges. If either of the two live servers go down for any reason, the corresponding fail-over server kicks in within seconds; most of the employees would notice nothing more than a small 'hiccup'.

8. Our IT Department (and contractors) is actually in the final stages of implementing a $340,000 project, which included (but was by no means limited to) Exchange 2007 and the VoIP. The next major upgrade I could foresee would be to add the ability for video confrencing.

9. We function as a civil engineering corporation that spans 5 locations and 2 states. The WAN allows us to share data effectively and efficiently with project team members whether it be the guy a cubicle over, or an employee 200 miles away. Also, with the addition of Exchange 2007 contacts and calendars are able to be shared company wide; no more stoping what you're doing, walk to the secretary, hope they know what Bobby is doing that day, and then return to your desk to add it to your calendar. No, since the implementaion we can merely open the shared calendars and view Bobby's appointments within seconds. Of course, this is very generalized for any company. As far as engineering, our network also allows surveyors or inspectors to VPN into the network and pull the most up to date spec sheets for review or the latest and greatest drawings to propose to the client.

sorry, didn't mean to write a book. hope this helps.