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Wow! Now that really is a hard question to answer isn't it? If you listen to what 'Barmy' Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO and 43rd richest person on Earth, has to say then you might be forgiven for thinking it is Google (I'm going to f****** kill Google), or maybe Apple (I've got my kids brainwashed... you don't use an iPod) or even Linux (... a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches.)

For while I even thought it was me, given my recent experiences with an Xbox 360 which I have been without for the best part of a month thanks to red rings of death and a Microsoft repair which resulted in the return of an even more broken games console.

But now, it seems, the answer can be revealed. At least for this week. Engadget reports that Microsoft really hates DHL.

It would seem that DHL managed to break even more Xbox 360 consoles than Microsoft itself, although in fairness it did have a train wreck to help out whereas the whole Microsoft red rings problem could be said to be a train wreck for the Microsoft publicity machine. But anyway, getting back on track, some 21,600 Xbox consoles are said to have been written off by a combination of impact damage, wetting and pilfering following the crash.

No problem, surely? The courier, whose freight train was involved, would simply reimburse Microsoft for the loss, right? Well it seems not according to the Engadget story. It reports that Microsoft is claiming DHL refused to compensate for the loss and so has filed a complaint which demands some $2 million in damages instead.

So, does Microsoft hate anyone else more than DHL at the moment? Over to you, people...

As Editorial Director and Managing Analyst with IT Security Thing I am putting more than two decades of consulting experience into providing opinionated insight regarding the security threat landscape for IT security professionals. As an Editorial Fellow with Dennis Publishing, I bring more than two decades of writing experience across the technology industry into publications such as Alphr, IT Pro and (in good old fashioned print) PC Pro. I also write for SC Magazine UK and Infosecurity, as well as The Times and Sunday Times newspapers. Along the way I have been honoured with a Technology Journalist of the Year award, and three Information Security Journalist of the Year awards. Most humbling, though, was the Enigma Award for 'lifetime contribution to IT security journalism' bestowed on me in 2011.

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Last Post by OlyComputers
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The company I work for uses Fedex, and they have a clause in the terms of service that a Plane crash is an "act of god" and they're not liable to pay out insurance. I see something like that coming up here but still think that between Microsofts overwhelming legal presence and the fact that it's going to be really easy for a jury to sympathize with Microsoft on this one... DHL is going to pay up in the end.

I receive packages from DHL a lot, and IMO they suck. Always late, leave signature required packages on a businesses front porch at 5:30 on a Friday, they've even delivered packages to us in station wagons (personal cars, not DHL vehicles) because the truck was broken down Hell I don't know if I've ever seen the front of a DHL guy, they knock on the door and run like hell. But Microsoft is a HUGE customer for anybody they work with and I'm sure that they'll move to Fedex or UPS if DHL really doesn't pay out. Losing $2m in product suddenly makes the money you save on shipping pretty trivial.

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