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I just set up a few website and i already submited them to major search engine directory. I submited them using search engine submit in my cpanel account and i noticed that search engine bot do not crawl my sites yet. Why?

:sad:

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Last Post by mnemtsas
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If you have only just updated them, you may have to wait for the search engine servers to do an update.. Maybe overnight..

I don't really know but it was just a thought

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Submitting to search engines is a total and utter waste of time. Try getting links from external sites to your site. This is the most proven way of getting search engines to spider your site.

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Your site has landed in what is known as "the sanbox." The crawlers just haven't found you yet, but they will.

Yahoo tends to be the slowest, and Google is the fastest. Getting established sites to link to yours is a major plus, but I've found that Google will find unlinked sites within two weeks.

Hope this helps!

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The 'Sandbox' has absolutely nothing to do with getting pages indexed. Supposedly the sandbox is a filter that Google (and only Google) applies to the search engine rankings of new sites for competitive terms. I have sites with many thousands of pages indexed within 2 weeks of putting the site up, and they are (probably) well entrenched in the sandbox.

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You have it a little wrong. The sandbox reaslly doesn't apply to adwords. It applies to new sites. The thought is, which hasn't been confirmed by the smug little workers at Google, is that Google is uncomfortable to rank newer websites until they have proven their viability to exist for more than a period of "x" months. So they throw the new sites in "the sanbox."

This is the potential crisis that some existing sites run into when they switch ip addresses (not domains) -- suddenly, their page rank goes to 0. Big sites tend to rebound quickly from this problem.

As I've said in other posts, Google is the fastest by far from my experience. But I also don't launch small sites.

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You have it a little wrong. The sandbox reaslly doesn't apply to adwords. It applies to new sites.

Actually I don't have it wrong at all. I didn't mentioned adwords, here's what I said:

Supposedly the sandbox is a filter that Google (and only Google) applies to the search engine rankings of new sites for competitive terms

Thank for repeating what I said and adding some useless rubbish at the bottom that takes this post further and further away from what the original poster asked. :rolleyes:

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It's not useless rubbish to people who understand it.

Take a few deep breaths, Google "google sandbox," and you'll find some very good and helpful information from people other than me about how Google seems to be treating new sites, as well as existing, high-ranking sites that aren't carefully moved.

As for competitive terms, that only seems to apply to Adwords. How else would Google rank competition unless people are bidding?

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Let me say it slowly, the theory is, the sandbox is applied for harshly for terms that are highly competitive, and much less harshly (if at all) for terms that are not competitive at all. Does that make sense? I'm still struggling to understand how you worked AdWords into this conversation at all......

Do you understand what I mean my highly competitive terms? If your site is targetting 'SEO' I'd call that competitive. If its targetting 'light blue chrome plated nylon 6/6 chamfered widgets' I'd call that non competitive. I've seen many new sites rank no1 in Google almost immediately for non competitive terms like book titles and so on. But they can take up to a year to appear in Google's top 200 for the high traffic terms they are really targettting. And when they do appear they appear with a bang, not a gradual climb.

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So you are arguing that Google is tracking what is competitive from an organic point of view, and then selecting sites to sanbox just for terms that are "competetive"? Where is the ROI?

Why would they invest resources to do this when they can simply protect the integrity of the index by sandboxing all new sites except those that meet a minimum criteria, such as page count? They could argue that big sites will likely stick around for a while, wheras a small one might be a doorway (therefore wait before indexing).

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
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