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i started html from the book head first html n css , and just in the second chapter , they're talking about having your own website and that it would help out in learning html. i dont really know anything about this, can anyone suggest if having my own website is required for learning? if so , what are the most affordable options... im a student , and ill just be doing this for the learning.

Edited by somjit{}

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  • I said, "you don't need an actual website to do that". If you are a student then learn everything you can about html, css, and even javascript. JorgeM is right though as there are a number of different GUIs out there where anyone with no knowledge of html and etc … Read More

  • Hi Somjit It's unnecessary to have a website in order to learn HTML and CSS. If you save web pages and style sheets to your local file system you should find any modern web browser is able to open them. However there are some aspects of the web that are … Read More

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    > i want to avoid having to buy a domain You dont have to buy a domain to host a web site. There are a lot of providers out there that will give you a free website including a domain name, but the name will be a sub-domain of a … Read More

  • Get yourself abyss web server, php5 and mysql server, all free, all installed on your pc, and you can buld, ammend, and change *proper* websites to your hearts content, without having to bother with a free, or paid server 'till you are ready. Read More

  • Seriously, just take this one step at a time. This apache installation stuff is nonsense to you right now. Learn HTML and CSS. As stated previously, and as you know by now, you don't need anything except a browser and a text editor. *Practice* and get good at both. Learn … Read More

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Personally, I don't think you should be referencing a book where you already need a website, especially if you are just starting out with learning about it. A good book will have you create your own webpages and you don't need an actual website to do that.

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I don't think you should be referencing a book where you already need a website

sorry , im afraid i didnt get you there...
i dont know if i need a website or not , and regarding the book , im only on the early chapters..

Edited by somjit{}

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So it is not an absolute requirement to know HTML & CSS to have a website. Many of the hosting providers have GUI driven packages and/or content management systems where you simply add content through some interface. However, if you are interested in having more control over the website where you can fully design the layout and styling, knowing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript will be very useful.

HTML is very easy to learn so if you have some interest in web development, it would be very beneficial for you to have HTML knowledge and experience.

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I said, "you don't need an actual website to do that". If you are a student then learn everything you can about html, css, and even javascript. JorgeM is right though as there are a number of different GUIs out there where anyone with no knowledge of html and etc is needed but if you want to actually learn about building a website from scratch, I wouldn't recommend that route.

Personally I don't write much html, I use SharePoint's gui to set up our internal website but I understand the basics (and maybe a little more) regarding html, css, and jscript.

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JorgeM : i want to avoid having to buy a domain , because i dont understand much of it now . i just only started a few days ago , and i made the post to ask if not having a website will slow down , or hamper learning proper html or css. im not learning java script at present , maybe in the near future, after getting these done. :)

but if i do have to buy one ... is there any affordable option you can suggest ? ill only be doing it for the learning part. nothing else , so perhaps i dont need anything fancy...

@stuggie :

If you are a student then learn everything you can about html, css, and even javascript

yes , i want to learn as much as i can , and from the examples you gave , im thinking getting a website will help. but i really dont have a clue about which hosting company to choose. being a student whose aim for buying a domain is just to learn html n css , i would like the most cost effective / less expensive (cheap sounds like a bad word) domain plan.... some suggestions on that will be great :)

thanks for the fast replies :)

Edited by somjit{}

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Hi Somjit

It's unnecessary to have a website in order to learn HTML and CSS. If you save web pages and style sheets to your local file system you should find any modern web browser is able to open them.

However there are some aspects of the web that are easier to learn if you have access to a web server. Without a server you may struggle with things like forms, cookies and AJAX requests.

Once you've got to grips with the basics of HTML and CSS, have a go at installing a web server locally. That way you can create your own websites locally, for free. As many as you like :-)

Two popular web servers are IIS and Apache, both of which are available for free.

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i want to avoid having to buy a domain

You dont have to buy a domain to host a web site. There are a lot of providers out there that will give you a free website including a domain name, but the name will be a sub-domain of a name they own. For example, if you go with wordpress, it would be something like yourBlog.Wordpress.com.

Most of these free providers allow you to have your own domain name, but you have to pay for that (a few bucks per year). In addition, these free providers have more features (more space, tools, etc...) that you can upgrade the free to paid account (a few bucks per month).

Now, back to learning HTML and CSS. You dont need anything. All you need is a text editor on your computer and a browser. For HTML and CSS, no web server, no web site is needed. Just your .HTML files and a browser.

Edited by JorgeM

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Once you've got to grips with the basics of HTML and CSS, have a go at installing a web server locally. That way you can create your own websites locally, for free. As many as you like :-)
Two popular web servers are IIS and Apache, both of which are available for free.

that sounds great! thanks :)
any links / tutorials for when i decide to do them? ( as iv just started , and its probably gonna be a little while since i get upto that point)

@JorgeM :

Now, back to learning HTML and CSS. You dont need anything. All you need is a text editor on your computer and a browser. For HTML and CSS, no web server, no web site is needed. Just your .HTML files and a browser.

yaaayyyy!!! :D

its getting clearer now, sorry iv i was a bit thick , yeah i am going the notepad++ + chrome way , just stuff gets confusing once in a while , and thats when i post on daniweb :)

Edited by somjit{}

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You dont need anything. All you need is a text editor

I agree with Jorge, but I would like to recommend using an HTML/css editor instead. Although HTML and CSS can certainly be edited in a text editor, they don't generally provide useful features like HTML and CSS validation or code completion. A decent HTML editor can help you avoid the type of mistakes that beginners often make. It'll save you a lot of frustration.

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When I was taking an HTML course at uni I only used notepadd++ and when I play around with html I still use it. I think it is a great editor for these purposes.

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i see , so i guess im good for now. but for when i decide to create my own websites (free or not) , can you guys suggest some good links? i guess that would wrap it all up. :)

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Get yourself abyss web server, php5 and mysql server, all free, all installed on your pc, and you can buld, ammend, and change proper websites to your hearts content, without having to bother with a free, or paid server 'till you are ready.

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It is helpful to have your own site because you can test your "projects" on the browser and see how it displays on a web page. It is best if you had a site to test your projects on unless you don't want to.

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i saw a few videos on installing apache web server , but they talked about making the webserver visible to all by port forwarding port 80. do i have to do that? since im doing this just to learn , i guess ill be fine without forwarding?

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Seriously, just take this one step at a time. This apache installation stuff is nonsense to you right now.

Learn HTML and CSS. As stated previously, and as you know by now, you don't need anything except a browser and a text editor. Practice and get good at both. Learn to use developer tools like Firebug or Chrome dev tools to debug/test updates to your pages. You need to be able to solve problems that crop up on the frontend.

After this, decide where you want to go next. I went to PHP (soon followed by MySQL) right after, but if I could go back I would have done JavaScript next. If you read books/tuts about rich web apps with PHP, and you don't understand JavaScript and AJAX, a lot of stuff can be confusing. I think it's better to learn the foundational client-side languages first (HTML, CSS, JS).

Once you're ready to move to server-side, the cheapest way is to install a server on your own computer. I use XAMPP, it's super easy to install and in no time you can have an Apache server up and running with PHP and MySQL. Then you just do your dev in the htdocs folder, point your browser to http://localhost/ , and see the fruits of your labor...

Edited by EvolutionFallen

Votes + Comments
its great when people share their experience. thanks for this :)
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but if I could go back I would have done JavaScript next

I'd suggest the same thing. In my opinion, here is a good order...

HTML --> CSS --> JavaScript --> AJAX --> jQuery --> Server Side Scripting (PHP, ASP.NET, etc..)

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you can check the w3schools website for basic knowledge of creation of webpage

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vinnitro mentions a great site. I reference w3schools for more than just java: they break down SQL quite nicely too.

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@ vinnitro , stuggie : i like learning from the web , and yes i have heard a lot good things about the site for learning html. However, i kind of share M's idea in that some other posts here in daniweb mentioned that they practised not the best styles , and had errors in a number of places, and that it would better to learn from a recent book updated with modern practises. so i got the 2nd edition (released middle of last year) head first HTML n CSS book, and i love it. (as with all the other books of their series.)

@EvolutionFallen , jorgeM : its great to learn from experience of those who have been there and done that. Thanks for clearing my ideas. i now know the path im hoing to move ahead in. :)

thanks a lot everyone for helping me out :)

Edited by somjit{}

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It is not necessary to learn css and HTML from e-books and traditional books also which is the best option to gain knowledge about HTML and CSS. HTML and CSS are the basic fundamentals of designing which everybody has to be learned from various sources to learn web designing.

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