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I fell pray to a nasty malware\trojan that cripped my computer, whereas when I logged onto Windows, whether it was a standard account or an administrator account, all I got was a blank screen, no icons, no desktop. To make matters worse, I was getting help on another forum; supposedly this person was suppose to know how to fix this issue, they have made it worse, by doing registry key edits, whereas now, I can log into my administrator account, with a blank desktop, but my standard account logs in, and after a few seconds, logs back out, automatically, not the case before I listened to this other person who informed me they were knowledgable and would fix my problem.

Can this be fixed, I don't have a recent backup, I hope I can fix this, I've read it's possible, well now this other person has made things worse.

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Last Post by Reverend Jim
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Did your computer come with a recovery partition? If so, you may be able to boot that and reinstall or repair the main system. If not, then you may be able to get a recovery disc from the system vendor. Barring those approaches, you will probably need to get a system disc from the system vendor. You will have to pay a nominal fee for that most likely, but that way you will be able to do a complete reinstallation, though note that will nuke all of your data. You can boot a live Linux CD/DVD and copy your data to an external drive first. Good luck!

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I restored a backup from January, I lost some settings and programs I had installed in the past two month, I'm slowly getting things back and at the same time remembering partionally what I had done the past two months, as well as I will be having a more solid backup solution this week, regardless if malware deletes everything, I'll recover in no time.

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I don't know how your system is partitioned but what I have done for years is (on a single disk system) to create a C and D partition where C is 60-70 gig (depending on how many apps you have installed), and D is the rest of the available space. I then relocate user folders (My Documents, etc) to D. I use disk imaging (Acronis, but Macrium Reflect is free and also excellent) on C after configuring my apps and installing all updates. That way when my OS goes south I only have to restore the last good image (data is already safe on D), apply all updates since the image was taken, then take a fresh image.

It also helps if you keep a log file (on D) with a list of all (or just major) changes to C so yoou can reapply those changes after restoring an image.

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