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Last Post by hyperbyte
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Mono?? C++ compiler no.

Your answer is g++.

Do a sudo apt-get install g++.

Edited by iamthwee: n/a

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As iamthwee has said, you need to install g++ to be able to compile C++ on *nix.

But if it's a C++ IDE you're after, then Code::Blocks is probably the best on *nix. Anjuta is another of the commonly used *nix C++ IDE's.

In both cases you'll still need to ensure that you've got g++ installed as both ide's are basically graphical frontends for gcc/g++!

Cheers for now,
Jas.

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If this isn't enough you could always try Eclipse (you'll still be using g++, but at least with a nice and shiny IDE)

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use fedora have many pack in DVD format eclipse,kdevelop etc. and is good for beginers

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If this isn't enough you could always try Eclipse (you'll still be using g++, but at least with a nice and shiny IDE)

Thanks, but I looked up Eclipse using the Synaptic Package Manager and all I found was a Java?

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hy eclipse use java platform to emulate other language in this way them can run on many operating sys.. eclipse start as java ide

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Personally I find Eclipse a bit slow and bloated on *nix. But that might be down to my crappy hardware more than anything else!

My IDE of choice for C++ on *nix is Code::Blocks. It's relatively small, it's fast, it looks and behaves similarly to Visual Studio and it integrates and works really well with the native *nix compilers (gcc, g++, nasm etc). Code::Blocks also ships with C/C++ project templates for several popular graphics/GUI libraries (wxWidgets, QT, OpenGL, OGRE, GTK etc), which can help to get new projects up and running quickly with a mininmum of fuss.

Incidentally, if you're interested in developing applications using C++ and wxWidgets, then the 'codeblocks-contrib' package is another must-have for Code::Blocks as it includes the wxSmith plugin, which can aid rapid application development with wxWidgets.

The wxSmith plugin extends Code::Blocks allowing you to visually/graphically place wxWidget controls on dialogs and windows. The plugin then auto-generates C++ code in your project in a very similar way to Visual Studio. If you've ever done any MFC development in Visual Studio on Windows; you'll find that using wxSmith with Code::Blocks is very similar!

Cheers for now,
Jas.

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