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I have a Quicksilver G4 with a DVD reader in it, and an old G3 clamshell iBook. I understand you can hook a Firewire cable between them and using Target Mode, use the G4's DVD reader to install OS 10.4 on the Indigo clamshell (the clamshell only has a CD reader.)
That all sounds straight forward except I didn't realize until today that there's more than one type of Firewire cable. Sheer genius - make several types of cables and call them all Firewire - those Apple guys sure are smart! The G3 Indigo iBook has a Firewire port that uses an Ethernet type jack, I believe that's called an IEEE 1394c jack, catchy name for sure. The G4 Quicksilver has a different type, it looks like a 6 pin... what a mess...
Questions: what kind of cable hooks the two together?

I'm pretty handy with a soldering gun and I have some cables and have thought of making one since I only need it for a short time. Is there a pin diagram available?
Thanks

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Last Post by dintymoore
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I assume you're referring to 6 pin to 4 pin FireWire connectors. I don't know much about the physical details of the connections, other than they're compatible with each other, but the 4 pin version lacks power. It's probably possible to wire a converter up yourself, but I would think it's a lot easier to just go to your nearest tech store and pick up a cable.

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No I don't believe I'm talking about a 4 to 6 pin adapter cable.
What I think I need is a 6 pin to 6 pin cable with a 1394c on one end and a male Firewire on the other. I went on eBay and I can't see anything like this. I get the feeling the IEEE 1394c is a rare bird.

Going to a tech store here for sure would result it wasted time, no cable and lots of revealed ignorance.

I would assume that there's a name for the cable I'm looking for.

Any techies know the name of the cable I need or know of a wiring diagram so I can make one up?

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My apologies, I understand what you're talking about now. I really haven't dealt with 1394c, but from what I've heard, it's supposed to be able to communicate directly with a regular Ethernet port. If your G4 Quicksilver has Ethernet, I believe you could just hook up a regular RJ45 crossover cable between the 1394c and 802.3 connectors and you'd have a normal connection. At least it's worth a shot.

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No need to apologize, I appreciate your help. I admit I'm frustrated. The computer world constantly presents the simplest problems in the hardest way. "How can we ask what 1 + 1 is in a way that no one will be able to get it?" seems to be the way. A common method is to make 1 thing and call it 5 different names. Another is to make 5 different things, all with the same name.

I forgot about the crossover cable, I have one and used it a few years back between two Powermacs.

But isn't this different? On the two Powermacs I was connecting two Ethernet jacks together. The iBook's 1394c looks like an Ethernet, but isn't. I'm squeemish about doing that. I'd be connecting Firewire to Ethernet (to boldly go where no man...). Unless someone for sure had done it successfully. Feels wrong but I don't really know. Fear of the unknown.

To recap, the reason for all this is because the iBook has no DVD drive, so I need to use the Quicksilver's DVD drive to install Tiger, which is on a DVD.

I will go look for the clamshells' pdf, maybe it's fine to do what you're suggesting.
Thanks

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I feel like an idiot.
Someone said once that you only learn when you're wrong.

Here's what it is:
The iBook Indigo clamshell has a normal Firewire jack like the Quicksilver G4, all you need is a regular Firewire cable.

Last night when I attacked this (after finishing and painting the back deck and mowing the lawn) I wrongly tried the Ethernet jack. Then I went on line and found misleading info based on that. I'm sure I saw something about the iBook using a 1394c Firewire jack. Then I look up that jack and see it's a Firewire that is the same as Ethernet...

So thanks and it seems resolved.

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