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hi All

can any one tell me how can i install DNS by using LINUX..
basically i have installed RED HAT.. and i havnt install BIND in that..

now i want to know that how can i install BIND by using commands.. and how can i install BIND by using commands...

can any one tell me ?

Thank you for your time..

Saqib

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Last Post by gloo
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what is RPM -Uvh bind -9.2.3-1.i386.rpm ?

It's a command you enter at the command prompt to install the rpm file that you've downloaded.

Additionally, you'll need to provide the complete path to the RPM and gain root access, so the final command that you enter might be like:

cd /home/you/Desktop
su
[enter your password here, although it won't show up onscreen]
rpm -Uvh bind-9.2.3-1.i386.rpm

Replace /home/you/Desktop with the path to the rpm (where your web browser saved it).

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On a local area network, when a computer wants to view something other than an IP address, it first looks in its internal DNS routing table. On Linux, this is usually in /etc/resolv.conf . If it can't find it in there, it asks the local DNS server (whose IP address is in its config) for the IP address of this name that it's trying to find. The DNS server than returns the IP address (if it can be found) to the computer.

When you enter a domain into your address bar, the first thing that happens when you press return is your browser sends a lookup domain request to your DNS server.

DNS servers are servers that contain tables of domains and their IP address that they point to, and these DNS servers are all around the world. They all contain the same data, so it doesn't matter which one you use. Usually, your ISP has a DNS server, so that is usually the one your browser uses to lookup domains, as it's the closest.

When the DNS server recieves the request, it looks up in its domain table, finds the IP address, and sends this back to your computer. Now that your browser has this information, it can then communicate directly with the web server to get the website.

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so if i wanted to point say, www.ben.net to my fixed IP adress, what would i need to do?

also, is thier any benefit of having domains on a linux LAN as opposed to just hostnames

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so if i wanted to point say, www.ben.net to my fixed IP adress, what would i need to do?

On your local DNS server, you would need to edit the /etc/named/named.your.domain and /etc/named.conf and add an entry pointing www.ben.net to your fixed IP address. If you don't know how to do this, try looking here:
http://www.xenocafe.com/tutorials/dns_linux/redhat/dns_linux_redhat-part2.php

also, is thier any benefit of having domains on a linux LAN as opposed to just hostnames

Domains are useful as you can use an entire domain to represent your LAN, and each individual computer can use a subdomain. Or, if you have a larger computer, you can use subdomains for subnetworks inside your LAN. Simply having hostnames works, but it's not as easy to see which network and computer it points to.

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Installing the DNS Server - BIND9:
Install a DNS server - BIND9:
apt-get install bind9
Check the server
Linux Terminal:
ping localhost
Go to the directory "/ etc / bind" (sometimes "/ etc/bind9").
Review the bind configuration files in this directory.

II. DNS server configuration - BIND9:
5th Edit the configuration file "named.conf":
Using the editor, please look at this file
At the end of the file before the line "include" / etc / bind / named.conf.local "," please add
the following lines:

zone "200.168.192.in-addr.arpa" {
    type master;
    file "/etc/bind/200.168.192.in-addr.arpa";
};
zone "201.168.192.in-addr.arpa" {
    type master;
    file "/etc/bind/201.168.192.in-addr.arpa";
};
zone "zz.lab.vs" {
    type master;
    file "/etc/bind/zz.lab.vs";
};

where "zz.lab.vs"
eg for animal group = 1, the name will be as follows:
z1.lab.vs
6th Creating and editing a configuration file "200.168.192.in-addr.arpa ':
The file should contain the following lines:

$TTL        1s
@       IN  SOA         localhost. root.localhost. (
                1       ; Serial
                604800  ; Refresh
                86400   ; Retry
                2419200     ; Expire
                604800  ) ; Negative Cache TTL
;
@       IN  NS      localhost.
yyy         IN  PTR         localhost.
yyy         IN  PTR         hostn1
yyy         IN  PTR         hostn2

where "yyy" is the last byte address assigned to the team "192.168.200.yyy"
7th Creating and editing a configuration file "201.168.192.in-addr.arpa ':
The file should contain the following lines:

; BIND reverse data file for local loopback interface
;
$TTL        1s
@       IN  SOA         localhost. root.localhost. (
                1       ; Serial
                604800  ; Refresh
                86400   ; Retry
                2419200     ; Expire
                604800 )    ; Negative Cache TTL
;
@       IN  NS      localhost.
1       IN  PTR         localhost.
1       IN  PTR         host1
2       IN  PTR         host2
3       IN  PTR         host3

8th Creating and editing a configuration file "zz.lab.vs"
The file should contain the following lines:

;
; BIND data file for local loopback interface
;
$TTL        1s
@       IN  SOA         ns.zz.lab.vs. root.ns.zz.lab.vs. (
                1       ; Serial
                604800  ; Refresh
                86400   ; Retry
                2419200     ; Expire
                604800 )    ; Negative Cache TTL
;
                IN  NS      ns
localhost   IN  A   127.0.0.1
ns      IN  A   192.168.200.yyy
host1       IN  A   192.168.201.x+1
host2   IN  A   192.168.201.x+2
host3   IN  A   192.168.201.x+3
hostn1  IN  A   192.168.200.yyy
hostn2  IN  A   192.168.200.yyy

where "zz.lab.vs"
eg for animal group = 1, the name will be as follows:
z1.lab.vs
9th Restart the DNS server

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