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Hello Everyone :)

I bet you have heard this about 1,000,001 times, but I am another individual who is interested in learning programming. I am currently a business major with a concentration in MIS. I have web site and graphic design experience, I have been developing static HTML web sites for small business and corporations for over 5 years. In addition, I have integrated my custom design templates onto open-source php applications such as: osCommerce and Joomla. Now it is time, to move into the real thing: C# and ASP!!

I would like to move away from graphic design and learn web development. I am interested in developing web application, hopefully a SaaS in the future.

My friend has suggested me to start off with learning VisualBasic, then move into C#, then into Asp.Net. Is this the correct path to take? Could I jump into C# straight or is better to start from VisualBasic?

I would like to find out from fellow members, what are some good books or online videos that I can buy to start off this adventure!

Thanks!

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Last Post by Rashakil Fol
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C# and VB.NET (probably what your friend meant by VisualBasic) are essentially the same language with a different look and feel. Pick which one you're more comfortable with and go with it.

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There is still a confusion with Visual Basic and Visual Studio and .NET.
As I see it : .NET is an application framework that contains a huge library of already coded "things" to make the life of a programmer much easier.
Visual Studio is an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) which supports .NET and different computer languages like Visual Basic, C# and C++ which are the most common, but there are others(eg F#)
So C# could as well be called C#.NET.
Shoot me if I am wrong.

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>There is still a confusion with Visual Basic and Visual Studio and .NET.
Not in this thread. The OP said VisualBasic, which while vague can be assumed to mean VB.NET because the alternative is C# and the ultimate goal is ASP.NET. Visual Studio wasn't mentioned until you brought it up, nor was the .NET framework independent of a language.

>So C# could as well be called C#.NET.
It could, but you would be wrong when talking about the standardized language because .NET isn't the only framework that supports C#. C#.NET would be meaningful for versions of C# that are only available from Microsoft, but then it would make more sense to be specific about the version of the language rather than just generally specifying .NET because that's how you can determine which extended features are supported.

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I was told to use VisualBasic first, to get my hands wet and get a feel. Then learn (C# - C Sharp).

Any thoughts? For a beginner, is it better to start off with VisualBasic first. Is C# too hard for a beginner to programming?

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I hate it when it seems like I'm being ignored. I'll quote the relevant part of my post one more time, then refuse to answer your question again if you continue to ask the same question after being given a suitable answer.

C# and VB.NET (probably what your friend meant by VisualBasic) are essentially the same language with a different look and feel. Pick which one you're more comfortable with and go with it.

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Narue,

I do not want to depend on a softtwre like VB.NET to plug in/use existing codes for. I would rather learn from scratch. I wonder, do universities have students start off with VB.NET then C# courses? I guess I should try VB.NET first then get into C# after I get a general knowledge and understanding.

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>I do not want to depend on a softtwre like VB.NET to plug in/use existing codes for.
Um...what? It seems like you have a skewed idea of the difference between C# and VB.NET.

>I wonder, do universities have students start off with VB.NET then C# courses?
Universities are leaning toward Java.

>I guess I should try VB.NET first then get into C#
>after I get a general knowledge and understanding.
Do I really have to spell it out for you? C# is not harder than VB.NET. C# is not easier than VB.NET. They're both equally powerful and flexible, the syntax just looks different. Choosing between C# and VB.NET should be like choosing between two identical shirts of a different color. Which color do you like better? That's it!

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Actually, ___ is easier than ___, because the syntax is less insane, and because my views on syntax should be shared by everybody ;)

Edited: the original version of this post had languages in the spaces, some folks in this thread might evade the need for some necessary critical thinking.

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