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I only recently heard about F#. I never knew that there was a language like that. I only noticed it when I was surfing for VS2010.

My question is, is F# a really good language, and whether it is useful to learn. Is it used for software/application development?

I just wanted to know this and whether it is OK to shift from C# to F#?

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Last Post by dluz
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>My question is, is F# a really good language, and whether it is useful to learn.
It's a decent enough language, and I always advocate learning new languages when you can. F# is useful, to answer your question, but it's not a replacement for C#.

>Is it used for software/application development?
I'm sure it is, but currently I'd wager only with the trailblazers. F# is still a new language and lacks a certain maturity that breeds confidence in choosing it for real projects.

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Thanks for the reply. I just started learning C# and I didn't want to change my mind. I heard that it is being released along with the VS 2010 beta. And I this article here is what made me take a notice of it.

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Of course F# is good. But so are C# or C++ and other languages for that matter.
I am a C# learner for the moment just as you.
Currently I'm reading this book.
F# seems to me a very promising language, but I believe it is still somewhat premature to be considered as a language that is used very often in bussiness today. Did you know they still hire COBOL programmers!?!

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I didn't know about F# yet. Thanks for pointing it out.
Looks like a scripting language though. Probably to be used for prototyping and non-performance-intensive apps.
I'll have to give it a try someday :)

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Looks like a scripting language though. Probably to be used for prototyping and non-performance-intensive apps.

Really? What makes you think it looks like a "scripting language"?

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I have seen and read the syntax of F# on the web. I did not like the syntax. It resembles the algorithms that I used to study when I was studying algorithm analysis subject in my college due its keywords such as let, do, open etc.

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Really? What makes you think it looks like a "scripting language"?

Well, the two first points in the article:
# succinct, type-inferred functional programming,
# interactive scripting like Python and other languages,

Whenever I hear "type-inferred" I cringe. To me it just means "hard to read".

Also a statement near the end "Unlike other scripting languages (...)" makes it pretty clear what's it trying to compete against.

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