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Last Post by WaltP
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No, some places do graduate schemes, take people (who aren't masters) on for less pay but pay for training so your home grown. Also if your at university/ collage you can get sponsored by a company and do work experience in a company in the hope that you will be hired afterwards if you impress them.

Obviously you need some sort of experience in programming.

Edited by ChrisHunter: n/a

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In the UK, don't they teach you the difference between YOUR and YOU'RE??? It makes understanding difficult.
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Do you have to be like a master programmer in a certain language to land a job in this field?

Of course not. The idea that professional developers are always masters of the craft is a romanticized fantasy that hobbyists dream up. The reality is that only a small fraction of professional developers are more than average programmers.

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This is true. There's a lot of bluff
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Of course not. The idea that professional developers are always masters of the craft is a romanticized fantasy that hobbyists dream up. The reality is that only a small fraction of professional developers are more than average programmers.

Seconded; I've had to deal with some pretty awful code written by long-gone employees and contractors. I've also been surprised more than once by applicants with job experience who seemed to know what they were talking about until we got to some of the technical questions, where they were completely lost.

Most development positions I've seen do require experience in specific technologies, and your level of expertise will make a significant difference--the more skilled you are, the more it will show, but remember that perfection is not expected. Never stop learning new things--and there are always new things to learn.

Depending on your local economy and applicant pool, there may or may not be "junior" or "associate" level positions available as well. Such positions can often be frustrating, but they can be an excellent opportunity to demonstrate your skill and initiative. I don't see so many of those around my area, but your mileage may vary.

Finally: Practice, practice, and practice some more. Especially if you don't have any prior job experience, you can still talk intelligently about personal projects you've worked on in an interview.

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Well I'm a sophomore at Georgia State University but my java programming skills are so so right now. I'm trying to get an internships or project to work on but I'm not having any luck yet. My gpa is a 3.49 and after this semester I will be a junior. I'm just worried that in the long run if my programming skills can affect me alot when I become an software engineer.

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I'm just worried that in the long run if my programming skills can affect me alot when I become an software engineer.

If you can't cook, would that affect you as a chef?
If you can't handle driving large vehicles, would that affect you as a bus driver?
If you can barely add and multiply, would that affect you as a math teacher?

This sounds like a question that answers itself. And one you need not be concerned with -- unless you don't plan on learning good programming skills. You just need to study, and practice. Get good.

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