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Last Post by Ene Uran
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Most important: curiosity. You can have all the skills in the world but if you are not curious about why that bump is there or what caused that little blip you will only ever be 'run-of-the-mill.'

That being said, I'd say you should have a strength in all of these areas and an acute focus in at least one:

  1. Data visualization (R, matplotlib, matlab, ...)
  2. Scripting and general data manipulation (SQL, shell, Ruby/Python, ...)
  3. Applied mathematical skill (statistics, machine learning, artificial intelligence, ...)

I'd suggest you at least be fluent in the tools of each category and have a more developed concentration in a particular application of one skill.

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What L7Sqr said, plus add formal logic. Without strong skills in boolean logic you are lost! I was an engineering major back before dinosaurs, and my philosophy class in formal logic has served me better than any programming or other software engineering or math class did for my career as a top-level software architect and engineer. And yes, I do "data science" also, having been very involved with Hadoop and data analytics.

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Hadoop with its eco systems, one most latest adopted technology for data science,data engineering,data storing,matalab (machine reading),Image processing technologies are also implemented using Hadoop or cloudera or other flavours of big data

Edited by nationalswmgmnt: add new information

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I would say English language skills. Everyone in our department hates to call the help desk, because you can not understand those imported folks that work there.

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