Hi guys,

I have been programming with vb since version 3 writing commercial applications. I have to write applications using the internet as the base block. I have never dealt with vb and internet controls, so I have no ideas as to how to write an internet app. with vb6. I have had suggestions to move to vb.net but, from wehat i have read it is cumbersome, code cannot be protected and hardware is a major requierement. Can anyone give me ideas on how to go around this issue?. Can I use vb6? or do i have to upgrade to vb.net?

Thanks....

VB6 and the internet are flaky.

That's why they upgraded to DOT NET.

But you can use the Windows API's to access the internet in VB6 ( which is probably what the DOT NET controls are built from anyway).

And you can use the drop in controls that come with VB6: the Microsoft Internet Transfer Control is probably what you're looking for.

If you want to use the APIs from the Platform SDK, look up WinInet. API's are a little bit confusing, if you're not somewhat familiar with C or C++, but with a little effort you can have a more robust application.

Hank

Hi,

When u say you have to build an internet application do u mean you want to create dynamic webs or what??

Thanks for your input!!!!.

The issue is that I have an legal application (app. that handles trials, finances etc....) using ms-access with VB6 and would like to start selling it. I have a very basic copy protection scheme and would like to improve it via an registering mechanism using the internet (as a beginning).

Obviously the main objective is to put the app. on the internet.!!!! (have to do it in an planified manner)

I would like to clarify my question:

1. I have been reading on the MS VB.NET environment and the first thing that hits me is that if I deploy my app. i have to include source code (although there is something called "CODE OBFUSCATION" or something like that.

2. My potential customers are varied (they have win98 through win xp) and as I know .NET requires "THE FRAMEWORK" to be installed or is already installed depending on the OS verison (another load on deployment). Believe me, my potential customers are like the "WHITE SHARK" (when he makes a prey) , give me your app. , let me install it and i am ready to use it.

3. As of know my app. eases installation of the client/server by only asking to register the server side software.

4. MS-Access might be an outgoing product, so I have to choose from an more stable Data Base product like SQLExpress, Firebird or Mysql which are FREE and my path to the Internet should be transparent or at least easier. The key here is that potential customers WILL NOT INVEST on an full Database Package.

So, in any case these are some of the questions I would like to have answered. By the same token, thanks for your INPUT!.

I have been reading on the MS VB.NET environment and the first thing that hits me is that if I deploy my app. i have to include source code (although there is something called "CODE OBFUSCATION" or something like that.

That's if your using a web page form. That's the code behind the form. That's visible to the user. All he has to do is right click and choose View Page Source. But your executables that your web page application, if that's what your hoping to design, are stored in the binary directory on your web page server.

There are obfuscation tools that mangle your executables so that a de-obfuscator has a difficult and close to impossible task in stealing your code. But on a web page, you will have the above problem. Visual Studio provides an obfuscator.

MS-Access might be an outgoing product, so I have to choose from an more stable Data Base product like SQLExpress, Firebird or Mysql which are FREE and my path to the Internet should be transparent or at least easier. The key here is that potential customers WILL NOT INVEST on an full Database Package.

Access is still a viable option. But it seems a majority prefer MySQL. But I find that the largest problem is not the database, it's the person designing the database. If the database is designed properly using the first three standard normalization rules, that takes care of the majority of problems. Other databases are not a solution to improperly designed database structure: a poorly designed database is unstable in whatever package it's used.

But frankly, if you're starting to develop Web Apps, then you should just bite the bullet and go with DOT NET. Visual Basic .Net is still just that: Basic and easy to use. It just has a whole lot more features designed to deal with the new data environment of the World Wide Web: XML integration being one of the primary features you'll probably want to use.

In an commercial app. How do you protect it in .NET?. I have seen products that will DECOMPILE anything and give you the source. I am confused!. Also, programming on server side will somehow protect you but, on client side who does it?. In VB which you deliver an .EXE I CAN PROTECT IT!.

I have seen products that will DECOMPILE anything and give you the source. I am confused!

That's what Obfuscators are for: to foil the decompilers. A lot of programmers don't bother with obfuscating their compiled program.

In deployment, you deploy certain files to be accessed over the intranet, internet, etc. The client uses an installer which is programmed to download the files that it needs it needs on the client side. A lot of these are precompiled files for the most part. These are the files that you want to obfuscate: your own controls, components, executables, etc.

client side who does it?

Who does what? Do you mean protect your compiled files that the client is using?

If you're concerned about piracy, Microsoft has published several articles on what the programmer can do to protect his program.

Use their encryption and decryption APIs from the SDK. Program checks in the program based on binary values from files instead of text. It's really hard to make any sense from a bunch of 1s and 0s. But give a pirate some text files from compiled files, and he's off to the races.

These are just a few hints. READ the MSDN documentation.

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