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This programming language, developed in 1993 claims to be the easiest/ quickest programming language around.
Is it fact or fiction? What do you all know about this language?

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Last Post by gamingfan1993
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It's a procedural language and it has few datatypes -- just integers, floating point numbers, and sequences. No mention of struct-like objects or records. My calculator has a more sophisticated programming language.

I don't think it's very good. Maybe it runs faster than Perl and friends but that's because it's incredibly simple. Or simple-minded. I'd pick Ruby over it any day.

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Wow there are so many programming languages, I couldn't imagine becoming efficient at all of them. God I have trouble learning java!

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It's a procedural language and it has few datatypes -- just integers, floating point numbers, and sequences. No mention of struct-like objects or records. My calculator has a more sophisticated programming language.

I don't think it's very good. Maybe it runs faster than Perl and friends but that's because it's incredibly simple. Or simple-minded. I'd pick Ruby over it any day.

I'm pretty new to programming and I took alook at Euphoria and thought the samething as you Rashakil, it lacks in alot of areas to me and that's what makes it so easy to learn. :(

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Ideally you should have an application first and than find the best language to code it in. This in turn means you need to know the basics about a number of languages.

I have used C, C++, C#, Delphi/Pascal and Python for some major projects. I keep looking at Ruby. Ruby is very powerful, but also somewhat cryptic. Let's call it the Perl malaise.

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Ideally you should have an application first and than find the best language to code it in. This in turn means you need to know the basics about a number of languages.

I have used C, C++, C#, Delphi/Pascal and Python for some major projects. I keep looking at Ruby. Ruby is very powerful, but also somewhat cryptic. Let's call it the Perl malaise.

Interesting point Vegaseat didn't think about it in that sense.

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I think you are being slightly unfair to Euphoria. I have just begun to look into it and I am impressed by the enthusiam of the user community who have submitted a large amount of code consisting of applications, games and extensions to the language into a common repository. Studying other peoples code is a great way to learn.
It seems to be a lightweight language like lua or rexx.
The native datatypes are not so limiting. Sequences allow you to build quite complex structures - a bit like Lisp. The interpreter is very fast and it can also be compiled to C. It has recently become open-source.

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Ideally you should have an application first and than find the best language to code it in. This in turn means you need to know the basics about a number of languages.

I have used C, C++, C#, Delphi/Pascal and Python for some major projects. I keep looking at Ruby. Ruby is very powerful, but also somewhat cryptic. Let's call it the Perl malaise.

I agree with Vegaseat. When I'm coding a shell, or a complex command-line app, I use C++, Python, or Ruby. If I'm trying to make a GUI app, I use Liberty BASIC, or wxWidgets for C++.

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