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I have a simple if statement going from 0-360 in 30 degree increments. I want to store those values into into an array because I need to use them for simple calculations later. I think I need an dynamic array because what I tried below is not working.

So I guess I have two questions. One is how much I get my array to store the values of x1.

Also, when I get my array working and lets say I want to do a calculation with 30 (lets say array[1]) can I just do randomvariable = array[1] * 2.0?

#include<iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;



int main()
{

double l1=25.0, l2=5.0, l3=20.0, l4=10.0 x1;
int array1[13];


for(x1=0.0; x1<361.0; x1+=30.0){
x1 = array1;
}



char x;
std::cin>>x;

return 0;
}

Regards,

-m

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Last Post by gerard4143
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the for statement can't use floating point types as the variant. You are allowed integers and enumeration types.

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Your going about this the wrong way, to initialize an array you must access each element..Like so

#include<iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
	double l1=25.0, l2=5.0, l3=20.0, l4=10.0, x1;
	int array1[13];
	int i = 0;

	for(x1=0.0; x1<361.0; x1+=30.0)
	{
		array1[i++] = x1;
	}

	for(i = 0; i < 13; ++i)
	{
		std::cout << array1[i] << std::endl;
	}

	return 0;
}
1

the for statement can't use floating point types as the variant. You are allowed integers and enumeration types.

Are you sure about your statement?

0

Sorry, I take that back; must only apply to 'c'; Just tired it on VC++6 and it worked.

0

Okay I understand you're method. Just for future reference if I did know know how many elements I had (in this case I had 13).

Would I have to declare a pointer?

1

Sorry, I take that back; must only apply to 'c'; Just tired it on VC++6 and it worked.

Again, are you sure about your statement?

0

Okay I understand you're method. Just for future reference if I did know know how many elements I had (in this case I had 13).

Would I have to declare a pointer?

An array name is a pointer. You mean, can you dynamically allocate the memory? Yes but if the number of array elements remains constant its better to use a static array.

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