Hi :)
i am creating a game in C#
the game contain a lot of windows and views
i heard about mvvm & mvc design pattern but when i search for them i get only things that relative to asp & wpf... and those are (if i dont get it wrong) web developers

should i leave the search for knowledge on those patterns?
i dont know nothing about them, i just heard on them and thought if i need to learn about them

should i?
thank u :)

Never give up a search for anything friend. I don't know anything about them and haven't heard of them. However I'm sure we can both wait around for some smarter people to get online and tell us all about them. For I am interested in them as well now. :)

Edited 4 Years Ago by lxXTaCoXxl: n/a

Hi :)i heard about mvvm & mvc design pattern but when i search for them i get only things that relative to asp & wpf... and those are (if i dont get it wrong) web developers

MVC = Model/View/Controller

You're getting a lot of ASP links because of Microsoft's ASP.NET MVC, which is an implementation of the MVC design pattern for ASP.NET.

MVVM = Model/View/ViewModel

This one is much more closely tied to Microsoft products; it came from them originally as a pattern for use with WPF. It's not as widely applicable as MVC yet, but that's only because it's newer.

should i leave the search for knowledge on those patterns?
i dont know nothing about them, i just heard on them and thought if i need to learn about them

These are useful architectural patterns; I would recommend you at least become familiar with the basic MVC pattern, perhaps leaving the more technology-specific patterns and frameworks for when you actually end up using them.

If you are creating an windows application using WPF, using MVVM pattern will be good. But these patterns namely MVC, MVVM are often used only for big architecture because it is kind of complex to learn.

But you can go ahead and learn..and you will be able to figure out for your game whethr MVVM ok or not.

There is a good msdn article..

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx

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