There have been a total of 9 different versions of Visual Studio now going all the way back to 1995. My question is for those of you who use Visual Studio, how often have you upgraded your Visual Studio version? Going from 2005 to 2012 for example, not applying updates, but actually buying a different version?

As with all software, when it no longer does everything that you need it to do, upgrade. The main caveat to that is if you're building secure applications and/or deploying for enterprise you'll probably want to stay current with the latest technologies.

how often have you upgraded your Visual Studio version?

I upgrade to the latest version shortly after it's released (since VC6), but for testing purposes rather than business use. For business use, I tend to wait until the first service pack or major update so that any bugs and irritants are shaken out.

So it kinda sounds like you update each time a new version is released?

I wasn't sure if the changes to VS were that big that it warranted updating each time, unless of course, like tinstaafl pointed out, you are building secure apps and need to be running the newest of the new.

So it kinda sounds like you update each time a new version is released?

There's no "kinda" about it, I do upgrade each time a new version is released, if only for testing purposes.

I wasn't sure if the changes to VS were that big that it warranted updating each time

There's usually at least one significant improvement or new feature that justifies the upgrade. Of course, if you're paying for a full version out of your pocket each time that changes things. As a Microsoft Certified Partner I get licenses as part of the benefits package. The Express versions are also convenient when cost is an issue.

I have 2010 Professional and since I am paying out of pocket, $499 for the upgrade every 2 or so years is a bit steep for me.

Wow...when I look at it, $499 is nothing in 2 years...I SHOULD be upgrading...Maybe I'll skip 2012 and just wait for the next one and pull the trigger then.

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