I have a code that when mouse hovers a button then it fires click event.But i want that when mouse hovers for 3 seconds then event must be fired.I have used intervals but could not find out solution. I have a simple windows froms c# application.

I have a code that when mouse hovers a button then it fires click event.

I would strongly recommend against this approach because it's unconventional and surprising. If an application I used did this, I would stop using it post-haste and look for an alternative.

I agree with you, but actually i am working on a project where i want to operate pc by using hand gestures rather then mouse. You may have seen different games and application for kinect. So i truly need this if any one can help me

There should be a hand gesture for click. It would be incredibly annoying if you only hovered it, especially accidentally, and then got stuck in a menu cycle of open and close because the detection wasn't working properly...

Thanks for your suggetion and i agree with that but right now i am just experimenting with different alternatives so any one has a solution then plz tell me.

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
     public delegate void EventHandler();

    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        int counter = 0;
        public static  event EventHandler Ontimee;
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }



        private void button1_Click()
        {
          MessageBox.Show("Your work");

        }



        private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            counter++;
            if (counter == 3) 
            {
                Ontimee += new EventHandler(button1_Click);
                Ontimee.Invoke();
            }

        }

        private void button1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            timer1.Enabled = true;

        }
    }
}

I think that this is what you want.Have a look at events Click Here, Good luck

I forgot to tell write to lines of code in the timer1_Tick EVENT
after

 Ontimee.Invoke();
 counter = 0;
 timer1.Enabled = false;

In this way you will be able to reuse your app...

Your solution will end up invoking the method an increasing number of times, each time you hover the button.

You only need to add the event handler once.

Additionally, this is a bad way for you to handle timed events. The timer will allow you to specify a length of time before it invokes the handler.

Edited 3 Years Ago by Ketsuekiame

Not much tbh, these are trivial mistakes that can have a big impact.

There are several Timer classes. I normally make use of the System.Threading.Timer class as, in my opinion, this is the best of those available (but be warned, it's not thread-safe like you'd expect it to be)

First, move the Timer setup into the OnLoad or Constructor.
Second, in the constructor parameters for the Time, set the callback as your method, add a synchronisation object (if needed), set the dueTimeargument to Infinite and set the period argument to Infinite.

To start the timer, call the Change method on the timer and set the dueTime argument to 3000 and the period argument to Infinite. This will cause your callback to be invoked a single time after the given delay period (note that this won't include the time it takes for the "hover" to take place, so it will be something like 3.5 seconds)

Here's a code example:

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using Timer = System.Threading.Timer;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        readonly Timer _myTimer;
        readonly Button button1 = new Button();

        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            button1.Click += button1_Click;
            button1.MouseHover += button1_MouseHover;

            Controls.Add(button1);
            TimerCallback timerCallback = MyCallback;
            _myTimer = new Timer(timerCallback, null, Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            // Do stuff
            MessageBox.Show(@"There's a snake in mah booooots!");
        }

        private void button1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            _myTimer.Change(3000, Timeout.Infinite); // timer will execute the callback after 3sec and only once
        }

        private void MyCallback(object stateInfo)
        {
             // This is better if you need to pass specific arguments.
            if (button1.InvokeRequired) // This is almost a certainty, but best to check anyway
            {
                button1.Invoke(new Action(button1.PerformClick), null);
            }
            else
            {
                button1.PerformClick();
            }
        }
    }
}

This will compile and work as an example :)

You can use the other timers too, set the interval to the required amount of time and Enable it. The problem I have with this, is that if your thread isn't marshalled properly (in time), there's a possiblity that the timer callback can execute a second time before you disable it. This becomes problematic at lower intervals.

To alleviate having to invoke, the forms timer will execute on the UI thread, but I really don't like that idea as you can deadlock easily.

Edited 3 Years Ago by Ketsuekiame

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