IE9 is on the horizon, and there has been plenty said about it. But what about its web development aspects? In this article I look at its web developer tools, and decide whether I'll start using it in my own web development. Like most web developers, I abandoned IE several years ago, only using it when I have to fight with cross-browser compatibility issues (which, thankfully, have mostly gone away thanks to third-party libraries such as jQuery, where other people took care of the cross-browser headaches for me). At some point with an earlier version of IE, Microsoft managed to …

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Back around 2004 and 2005, I had embarked on a web project that included the ability for my users to draw on a web page—or at least, that was one of the requirements. At the time, most of my web development had been server-side, with very little JavaScript. Long story short, I ended up shelving the project—not because the project wasn’t a good idea (it was a project planning and collaboration tool), but because the browsers simply weren’t up to it. I explored numerous libraries for drawing on the browsers, but talk about a major headache. The reason for the …

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This past Summer, Microsoft announced the beta of a new product called WebMatrix. Two weeks ago, the third beta came out. But before I talk about it, I have to ask: Is this a new product? Or am I having déjà vu?[ATTACH]18093[/ATTACH]WebMatrix (one word) is, in fact, a brand new product from Microsoft (contrary to what some tech journalists have reported), even though the name has been recycled from an earlier web development tool called Web Matrix (two words) that many of us remember dating back to the around 2003. That earlier product has very little in common with this …

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I've been using jQuery for a few years now, and the more I use it, the more I like and appreciate it. It seems like I'm always finding new ways to use it, and usually those new techniques result in me writing less code and ultimately being more productive. On May 3, jQuery 1.6 was released; then almost immediately, on May 12, came a new patch for this major release called 1.6.1. The 6.1 release included a major change to the way jQuery handles attributes, and a lot of people were upset about the change, as it had the potential …

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When I first started working on this article, I was originally planning on reviewing a different product, a new project from Eclipse called Orion. However, it turns out that project just isn't ready for prime time. It's still in a very early stage, and I don't feel I would do it justice by reviewing it yet. But while I was reading about it, I realized that a new product that I had already known about had just officially been released. That product is called Cloud 9 IDE. Now right up front I want to point out that even though Cloud9 …

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Last week, I took a look at Node.js, a powerful server-side implementation of JavaScript. But one thing I found lacking was the way to easily create a web server. Essentially, Node is an implementation of CommonJS, which adds operating systems features to JavaScript. But Node is not a web application framework. If you want to build a web application in Node, you either need to do a lot of coding, or find a good framework that somebody else built. And that's what I found here—a framework called Express.js. In four words: This thing is sweet. Let's take a look at …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]19350[/ATTACH]In the past, the word "JavaScript" usually triggered notions of buttons changing when you float your mouse over them, and images flashing, and silly animations happening in the web browser. Today, however, most programmers recognize that JavaScript is actually much more than that; it's a powerful language that runs in the browser, and it's the foundation of modern web-based applications. And the language itself has some very cool constructs that make it easy to write sophisticated code. People such as myself who use JavaScript extensively appreciate its functional approach to programming. But we often hit a problem when working with …

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How do you create a mission-critical website providing exceptional performance yet at the same time being flexible, reliable and scalable? That's the question that Kyle Loudon, a software developer and manager of a user interface development group at Yahoo!, sets out to provide the answers to in his book: Developing Large Web Applications. [attach]17205[/attach]Sub-titled 'producing code that can grow and thrive' Loudon has adopted a practical approach to developing large web applications that remain effective as they scale up in terms of features, functions and users. His past experiences, including developing a flight planning system that's used by airlines worldwide …

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The other day Google announced a new API console to simplify working with their various APIs. These APIs are basically REST-based calls into the Google servers where you connect through a URL, passing different parameters in the URL itself, and get back a response. The response comes back as either XML, or as JSON, which is ideal for a client-side JavaScript program. (Although most server-side languages such as PHP and C#/ASP.NET provide parsers for JSON as well, so you can process the results on server-side if you prefer.) As has been the case since the early days of the Google …

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The End.