My van was built 15 years ago by Mazda in Japan as a multi-purpose 'people carrier' vehicle with the unlikely name of a Bongo. It has survived the years well, and I have now converted it into a camper van. Another 15 year old that travelled across the globe has not survived the passage time, and we can be thankful for that because I'm talking about the Love Bug. No, not Herbie the talking VW Beetle from those candy-sweet Disney films but rather a computer worm that spread like wildfire in May 2000. Also known as 'ILOVEYOU' thanks to the …

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Another month, another flaw related to the historical US export restrictions on cryptography; this time in the form of LogJam. It hits SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 which supported reduced-strength DHE_EXPORT ciphersuites, restricted to primes no longer than 512 bits, meaning that a man-in-the-middle attack is possible to force the usage of the lower export strength cipher without the user being aware and which impacts something like eight per cent of the top one million web domains and all the major web browser clients. Well almost, because Internet Explorer has already been patched (nice one Microsoft) with Firefox expected to …

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It all started pretty well, with the announcement by Mozilla at the end of last month that the Firefox web browser would make the Internet a safer place by encrypting everything. That's everything, even those connections where the servers don't even support the HTTPS protocol. Developers of the Firefox browser have moved one step closer to an Internet that encrypts all the world's traffic with a new feature that can cryptographically protect connections even when servers don't support HTTPS. The 'Opportunistic Encryption' (OE) feature essentially acts as a bridge between non-compliant plaintext HTTP connections and fully compliant and secure HTTPS …

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With no actual Halloween-based security threats to report, it looks like the security vendors have had no choice but to start reporting scary stuff that might happen to your data instead. While I have no qualms about genuine warnings to 'be careful out there' this Halloween, a little reminder about not clicking like an idiot on something stupid just because it is seasonally apt is never a bad thing, I do have a bit of a beef when that advice is wrapped up in a press release in order to get some column inches for the vendor concerned. I will …

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All right stop, collaborate, and listen. A new variant of the ZeuS financial malware platform known as Ice. This baby Trojan spawned from the original Ice IX is targeting bank customers on both sides of the pond. Here in the UK the 'big three' telecommunications providers are where it is flowing like a harpoon, daily and nightly. One thing is for sure, this ain't no vanilla ice attack. [ATTACH=RIGHT]23731[/ATTACH]OK, rubbish pop rap references apart, this is actually quite a serious deal. The new Ice TX configurations are apparently not only stealing bank account data, as if that weren't bad enough. …

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First we had the news that [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story276878.html"]IBM was helping clean up crime[/URL] in the US and UK, now it seems that Sweden is getting a touch of the Big Blue Brother effect. The city of Stockholm is launching a project using IBM's streaming analytics technology in order to gather real-time information on, well, pretty much everything that moves. Working in collaboration with the [URL="http://www.kth.se/?l=en_UK"]KTH Royal Institute of Technology[/URL] the project is already gathering real-time data from the GPS devices installed in some 1500 taxi cabs and will soon add delivery trucks, traffic cameras, traffic light sensors, rail systems and weather …

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Over the last couple of days the online media seems to have gone crazy for the news that the Google Chrome web browser client has overtaken Microsoft Internet Explorer to become the most popular browser on the planet. This based entirely upon the fact that, for a single week, and according to figures from the StatCounter service, Chrome reached a 32.76% share against the 31.94% share enjoyed by Internet Explorer. But does this really mean that Chrome is now the number one client, and should web developers be giving more design love to it than Internet Explorer as a result? …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]22544[/ATTACH]Three and a half years ago, DaniWeb was reporting how [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/networking/news/218954"]stolen credit cards could be purchased online[/URL] for as little as $10 per card, complete with a guarantee that the accounts behind the cards were active, when purchased in larger volumes. So how has the market changed since the start of 2008? It should come as no real surprise, given the number of high profile data breaches which have resulted in the loss of credit card information from online databases, that the underground cybercrime marketplace has become pretty saturated with credit cards for sale. And whenever a market gets saturated …

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An analysis of 100 million security software installations in 144 countries claims to have determined just where the most dangerous, places to access the Internet are. The results are surprising to say the least. [attach]16939[/attach]The results of [URL="http://www.avg.com"]AVG Technologies' first ever Global Threat Index[/URL] report were published yesterday, and concentrated on answering one question: where in the world are you most likely to be hit by a malicious computer attack or virus? The answer, it would seem, would be the Caucasus region. Web surfers in Turkey, Russia, Armenia and Azerbaijan are the most likely to face security threats whilst using …

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I write like Dan Brown. At least, that's according to the I Write Like [URL="http://iwl.me/"]site[/URL], which was sweeping the Intertubes yesterday (more than 100,000 [URL="http://www.codingrobots.com/blog/2010/07/14/100000-in-one-day/"]hits [/URL]in a single day) as people tried to find out which Famous Writer their deathless prose most resembled. (Brown is the critically slammed author of[I] The DaVinci Code.[/I]) [ATTACH=right]15835[/ATTACH] The site was put up on July 9 by Coding Robots, a Silicon Valley-based developer, according to the company's [URL="http://www.codingrobots.com/blog/2010/07/09/i-write-like/#comments"]blog[/URL]. "Currently it analyzes vocabulary (use of words), number of words, commas, and semicolons in sentences, number of sentences with quotation marks and dashes (direct speech)," wrote …

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The latest MessageLabs spam index reveals that relative to its market share, any given Linux machine is five times more likely to be sending spam than any given Windows machine. But what are the facts behind those headline grabbing numbers and can Windows really get off the hook that easily? MessageLabs Intelligence Senior Analyst, Paul Wood has spoken out on the much discussed issue of spam being a Windows generated problem, noting that it is "more commonly sent from computers running Windows than from those running other operating systems" but adding "spam not identified as coming from botnets was seen …

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I have a lot of passwords to get me onto various online sites and services, but I only need to remember one: the complex and hard to crack one that unlocks my encrypted password store. Not everyone is as paranoid as I am it seems, and many fall neatly into the dumbass category if a recent analysis of 32 million consumer passwords is anything to go by. A data security company called Imperva undertook a [URL="http://www.imperva.com/ld/password_report.asp"]detailed analysis[/URL] of breached consumer passwords, and the very fact that they ended up in the 32 million breached passwords database suggests that they were …

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It's good news for those in the security business, according to Gartner at least. It is predicting that security software and services spending will outpace other IT spending areas in 2010. The Gartner [URL="http://www.gartner.com/DisplayDocument?ref=g_search&id=1141513&subref=simplesearch"]report[/URL] suggests that security software budgets will grow by approximately 4% in 2010, while security services budgets will grow almost 3%. Earlier this year Gartner surveyed more than 1,000 IT professionals with budget responsibility worldwide to determine their budget-planning expectations for 2010 and the results form the basis of this new report. "In the current highly uncertain economic environment, with overall IT budgets shrinking, even the modest …

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The End.