[ATTACH=right]16190[/ATTACH]At a time when newspapers are having a hard time convincing people to pay for online access to their news, one site is having much better luck getting people to go online and pony up some cash to give directly to journalists who use the donations to then go out and report stories. The site is [URL="http://spot.us"]Spot.us[/URL], it originally got going a few years ago with a Knight Foundation grant and a mission to experiment with the idea of using crowdfunding via the web to report stories that were going unreported in the San Francisco Bay Area. After successfully crowdfunding …

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In the final days of a failing model, old media made one last futile attempt to save its fading way of life by trying to expand copyright law to exclude fair use and linking. Just this morning, my DaniWeb colleague, Sharon Fisher wrote a post called [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4479.html"]This Blog Post Could Be Illegal[/URL]. Seems Richard Posner, a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago has written a [URL="http://www.becker-posner-blog.com/archives/2009/06/the_future_of_n.html"]blog post[/URL] of his own (note the irony here) that copyright should be expanded to bar access to any copyrighted material without the copyright holders express consent …

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One of the big rules of online advertising as I understand it is that you count success to a great extent based on how many people click through to your site. It's really the basis of how people get paid by Google for [URL="https://adwords.google.com/select/AdSenseLoginToAdWords"]Google AdSense[/URL]. If you get click-throughs you get paid and advertisers pay Google based on this number, but a [URL="http://www.btobonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090612/FREE/906129979/1001"]new study[/URL] has found that there is value in people simply seeing the ads, so long as the person is fully engaged with the content and there is some contextual relationship between the content and the ads. [B]Hasn't …

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[URL="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-10234622-93.html"]Ms. Mayer went to Washington[/URL] the other day to defend Google against recent attacks that it is responsible for the ongoing problems of newspapers. Marissa Mayer, who is the Vice President, Search Products and User Experience at Google testified before a Senate sub-committee on '[URL="http://commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Hearings.Hearing&Hearing_ID=7f8df1a5-5504-4f4c-ba34-ba3dc3955c61"]The Future of Journalism[/URL].' Not surprisingly she vigorously countered arguments that Google was siphoning off profits from news organizations, a position taken recently by AP, Forbes and the Newspaper Association of America. While Google makes a convenient scape goat for the troubles facing print journalism these days, it would be gross over-simplification to suggest if Google …

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[I]Video killed the radio star. Pictures came and broke your heart. ~Buggles, Video Killed the Radio Star[/I] It turns out the old song was wrong. Video didn't kill the radio star and the internet didn't kill the newspaper industry. It was a failure to embrace new technology, to believe they could continue to do things the old way while the world changed, a steadfast refusal to understand the new ways of doing business. What happened to the news business was a combination of myopia and intransigence, a complete lack of vision and leadership and buying into to the whole decade …

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There was a big fuss earlier this week when The Sunday Times of London published an [URL="http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article5489134.ece"]article[/URL] claiming that every Google search was the equivalent of boiling a pot of tea. My my, talk about a tempest in a tea pot. The Times attributed this bit of profundity to a prestigious Harvard University physicist named Alex Wissner-Gross, who is working on research on the environmental impact of computing. It [URL="http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/01/12/revealed-the-times-made-up-that-stuff-about-google-and-the-tea-kettles/"]came out later in the week[/URL] after everyone thought about it that this didn't add up. The Times quickly back-pedaled on story and Wissner-Gross said the writers had mis-interpreted what he …

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[I]A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes. ~Mark Twain. [/I] This week we learned what can happen when Citizen Journalism runs amok when an untrue rumor began circulating that Apple CEO had suffered a severe heart attack. As soon as the original report hit the CNN Citizen Journalism site, [URL="http://www.ireport.com/index.jspa"]iReport[/URL], the rumor spread like wild fire around the internet. Within the hour, however, [URL="http://www.mahalo.com/Johntw"]some professional journalists [/URL]made some phone calls and learned it wasn't true--Jobs was fine. The SEC is now investigating the citizen journalist who wrote the piece--who goes …

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Community journalism encourages members of the community to participate in the news process, not just as passive readers, but as active producers of the news itself. This direct connection to the product is similar in many ways to the kind of community building that goes on in open source development. Perhaps that's why it's not surprising that Patrick Phillips, who is Editor of the [URL="http://vineyardvoice.org/"]Vineyard Voice[/URL], a publication based in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts (an island off the coast of Cape Cod), has developed a community participation model for his publication while delivering the publication using the open source content management …

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The social networking site MySpace has added a new feature that brings MySpace into the journalism world: [URL="http://news.myspace.com/"]MySpace News Beta[/URL]. It has a system very similar to Digg, that is, it allows users to rate and promote content to the front page. With over 160 million users, a feature like this surely does not take long to use. Seeing that MySpace is extremely popular with younger-type people, it seems that one thing that the MySpace designer(s) overlooked is the target audience. Of course, MySpace isn't expecting a huge percentage of users to be journalists, so they have set up a …

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The End.