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Hi all

I finished a Graduate Diploma in Computing last year - with majors in programming (VB6 and Java) and database management (Oracle 9i, SQL) and haven't been able to get IT work because of not having professional IT experience. There are lots of IT jobs around but everyone wants a minimum of 1-3yrs experience, even for a GRADUATE!!! So how does one get that experience, if one can't get a job in the first place?

Incidentally I also have a BSc and an MSc plus 20yrs' work experience in a non-IT field. Perhaps employers think I'm too old??

Thanks a lot for any feedback
cobberas

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Last Post by Bspears
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In my experience, it helps to know someone on the inside of a company that's hiring. Any edge like that will help you. I have helped lots of people find jobs over the years and changed careers too and find that knowing someone helps a lot.

If you don't know someone, as I didn't when I made my career change, you'll have to take a lower-level, entry type job until you can "prove" yourself. IT folk are very protective of their ground.

Your other alternative is to sign up with a firm that does temporary placement or contract jobs. Get in, show your stuff, and then get hired.

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In my experience, it helps to know someone on the inside of a company that's hiring. Any edge like that will help you. I have helped lots of people find jobs over the years and changed careers too and find that knowing someone helps a lot.

If you don't know someone, as I didn't when I made my career change, you'll have to take a lower-level, entry type job until you can "prove" yourself. IT folk are very protective of their ground.

Your other alternative is to sign up with a firm that does temporary placement or contract jobs. Get in, show your stuff, and then get hired.

If all fails volunteer(if you can afford it) works all the time.

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If all fails volunteer (if you can afford it) works all the time.

Thanks a lot guys - makes sense.

I did in fact wonder about doing volunteer work so I'm glad to hear that it's a workable option. I guess it's something you just gotta do to get a foot in, if you don't have someone to give you a leg-up.

IT folk are very protective of their ground.

That's a useful insight to have. What's the story? Is it a matter of maintaining work quality? Or is it something more cultural?

Cheers & thanks heaps for your input
cobberas

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Most of the "college graduates" are only book smart, and when it comes to working on a live network, one must have real world experience.

You did not say what part of IT you are looking to get into. You wanting to program? do desktop work? network managment?

As was said above, easiest way to get experience is to volunteer or do an internship through the college.

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You did not say what part of IT you are looking to get into. You wanting to program? do desktop work? network management?

Software development using C++, ideally in the biomechanics field but not fussy at this stage.

How about trying to work as a freelance programmer ?

Great idea! I hadn't thought of that at all so thanks for the lead & the links.

Cheers
cobberas

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I have just started the whole process and switching gears from web development to software development and programming. I wondered how to gain experience myself. It seems to me that their are tons of projects out there for beginners (open source everything these days) I believe if you have a project in mind you can even work a cooperative with other programmers or sell your work?

I believe Freshmeat, Code Guru are types of places to work on projects? Like I said am new to all this but I willing to learn.

Like the above mentioned there are tons of Freelance jobs out there...

I am just wondering what the best course of action is going into this? I am only in the intro to SQL, C++ courses and I will be looking into VB.NET I have a BS in Business Admin but want to market myself properly and wondering if it is worth getting the Masters in an IT field and which one would be best? Degrees and titles mean very little to me at this point, I just want something marketable and viable towards programming, database management, creation, JAVA, and a few others

I have heard of these boot camps that you can get all these certs in a matter of months for 30k but are they worth it?

As you can see, I have issues. lol

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wondering if it is worth getting the Masters in an IT field and which one would be best? Degrees and titles mean very little to me at this point, I just want something marketable and viable towards programming, database management, creation, JAVA, and a few others

I have heard of these boot camps that you can get all these certs in a matter of months for 30k but are they worth it?

G'day Bspears
One big advantage of doing a certified degree course (rather than boot camp) is that the longer courses often have an 'industry project' segment whereby students line themselves up a real-life project in industry, which they do for free with some kind of technical support from their course teachers. It's a terrific way of getting a foot in the door & lots of (good) students end up with employment in the company they did their project with. So if you can find a course that includes the topics you're targeting (programming, database management, creation, JAVA, etc) plus includes an industry-based project, & you have the time/finance to do the course, I'd go for it.

Hope that helps
cobberas

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Well my problem is finding a hands on Master level program..most like someone else said above is book knowledge. I am wondering what schools if any online offer this type of regimine combining real world application, hands on approach to programming? I only know of a few Tech schools.
If I leave any out please let me know or if the ones i've mentioned aren't worth looking into let me know.
ITT
Devry
Strayer
ECPI

I believe these schools are for the most part have certification level courses.

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