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Whether it be Windows, Linux, college, etc.

What kind of degree/certification do you have that makes you a computer guru/geek?

All I have is an associates degree in networking

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Last Post by MIGSoft
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I have a MOS Word Core certification. Not too bad for a high school freshmen. Also I'm the only freshman in advanced programming.

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I don't have any formal certifications, well, most of what i know are what i've read. and if there are things that i don't know, i ask people who knows...

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I stopped getting certs after A+ for awhile. The only reason I went for the A+ test is because my employer at the time paid for it. I was about 2 days out from taking all 6 MCSE tests when I cancelled it, for reasons that are too lengthy to post here.

The only Microsoft cert I have is an OEM cert, the MCPS (Microsoft Certified Preinstallation Specialist) which I got years ago when working for a small (now extinct) mom and pop chain (Apex Computers.)

Recently (about a month ago) I registered for both the Linux+ and the LPI Level I and II certs (LPI = Linux Professional Institute, http://www.lpi.org) just to see if I know enough about Linux (*cough*) to get them :)

Aside from that, I don't plan on going for any more certs for awhile yet. Not because I don't want them, but because I'm too busy to study/refresh for them. I probably *should* get more, like some of the other CompTIA ones (for starters) and some security-related certs, but I'm not one to look at how many letters follow someone's name.

I was going for a B.S. in "Telecommunications Management" at DeVry, but the travel involved, along with some other factors, made me rethink my educational goals. I'll be attending a local community college this Fall to get an A.S. degree in networking (well, I'll be paying a lot of money for the piece of paper...) just to use my G.I. Bill for something before it expires. Well, that, and because a lot of really hot chicks go there, and I need a girlfriend :)

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currently have an Associate in computer programming and im working on my B.S. degree in computer science. no certs :)

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I don't currently have anything but I am working towards BTEC National in eMedia Production

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I have a Macromedia certification in ColdFusion, and in May I'll have a bachelors in computer science and two minors: Psychology and Business Computer Information Systems.

In the future I plan on getting certified in MCSD, MCDBA, MySQL, and Sun Java Programmer. After I graduate, I'll take take the i-Net+, and after I pass that, I'm automatically qualified to get a CIW certification because their tests pretty much overlap. I just have to pay money, I forgot how much, and baddabing.

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im Cisco certified (back in high skool) other than that my skills were gotten from expereince and fellow peers.. i should go and get some more ... and go to college im such a slacker... but either why i have to wait .. im on a restriction from computer still for 2 more years... damn government....

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really got caught "hacking" into my skools computers. changing grades.. etc. this is when i was dumber than the dumbness im now.. and got probation for 5 yrs from computers,,, i only got the job i have now (cingular wireless customer service) becouse they have me behide a restricted user name(so they think)... thats why damn the government ... and becouse the only thing i can expect out of life (from the government) is TAXES and DEATH (thell be the death of me)haha lol... you know how its goes just the little stuff i hate...i could keep going...

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Dang, there are alot of smart people. Where did you go to get these certs? I mean what courses did you take? and about how much did you pay for them?

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Nothing to brag about just the basic OS knowledge.

Computer Fundamentals (Win 95/98)

Computer Fundamentals (Win XP)

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BAS in CIS, BA in Religion (religion was the first one :p). I am now a Macr0$haft certified professional in Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point (paid for by Uncle Scam...the USAF rocks in one aspect...paying for 100% of college). I'm working on some Linux certs from LPI and plan on getting my A+ (currently enrolled for A+) and MCSA sometime in the first half of next year.

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Dang, there are alot of smart people. Where did you go to get these certs? I mean what courses did you take? and about how much did you pay for them?

I think most certs can be earned by reading books than taking a class. Of course college diplomas can only be earned by going to college. Doh. I don't think colleges that offer online classes have too much worth.

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i know the A+ isnt anything to brag about, but here i am. I didnt have to pay for the class, i just sign up for it. The cost of the certification test is only like $50, and if i pass they give back $30.

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i know the A+ isnt anything to brag about, but here i am. I didnt have to pay for the class, i just sign up for it. The cost of the certification test is only like $50, and if i pass they give back $30.

It is something to brag about. Not anyone can pass it. I hear people brag about how easy it is all the time yet they're not even certified in it. You would think, that they brag about it, that they'd go out there and get the certification themselves. You should be proud of any certification because it took at least some effort to get it. Even if you know the stuff, not getting a book on it and at least understanding the format of the exam is just asking for trouble.

I'm certified in ColdFusion and I'm quite satisfied. I know that not anyone can pass it, and that's what adds worth to the certification.

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Certs huh... well Cisco 1 was quite difficult and that was only the basics, but as things progress and even more things come out, it's quite nice to know it.
My certs are:
ECDL
A+
Cisco 1
Nose
not too brag, but having a class which doesn't show up and have bad grades, it's nice to know that your top class :p even if you had C's and B's. It's really a miracle how I passed projects with these lousy bunch though.
I still need to go another year before I pass, but this is what I have so far.

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Certified Electronic Technician (C.E.T.) -- 3 Journeyman certificates (Consumer, Industrial, & Audio) since 1976, A+ Certified.

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Whether it be Windows, Linux, college, etc.

What kind of degree/certification do you have that makes you a computer guru/geek?

All I have is an associates degree in networking

Well, the first thing you have to understand Blue is that a Cert is not a sure gurantee that you wiil get a better job or more money. A perfect example of this is the flood of "paper" MCSEs out there. I'm not sure I'd let half of them load a VCR tape let alone an operating system.
The next thing to keep in mind is that employers are looking for a number of things, which include Certs but more likely they will look at your experience and a laundry list of other things. Take my word on this one, My friend/boss is actively involved in our recruiting process.
Another important point is that Certs are like clothing fads, they are constantly changing and who knows which one will be hot next. A good example of this is the infamous Novell CNE Cert. I know that my company (years ago) spent tens of thousands of dollars on Novell training for others and today they are about as usefull as used toilet paper.
To sum it up, obtaining Certs is one small part of a well rounded IT professional. Look to balance experience with Certificates. You'll also need to be able to sell yourself to employers which means you will need social skills. One step further on this, you'll need to be able to translate "techie terms" to non technical co workers and managment. As if this isn't enough, you'll need to compete against thousands of others who are trying to do a better job at it than you are.
So you see, it's not what Cert will get me where I need to go, it's, "What things do I need to master in order to stand out from a crowd and leverage opportunities when I am successful at doing so?".
Make sense?
If you walked in to an interview with me and my boss and all you had was a piece of paper/CERT and you couldn't answer questions to demonstrate a high level of techincal unsderstanding, We would direct you to the nearest bathroom and tell you how to use that piece of paper. Then go have lunch at a nice place like we usually do!

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I have a little knowledge about computers, I love technology and have been working in the cell phone industry for 5 years. I am looking into skidmore college in white plains NY, I would be taking the IT series pc and networking design with security program, this will make me msce certified along with scnp certified. My question is will this pay off? Can anyone with these certs tell me how it worked out for you. Thanks

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I have a little knowledge about computers, I love technology and have been working in the cell phone industry for 5 years. I am looking into skidmore college in white plains NY, I would be taking the IT series pc and networking design with security program, this will make me msce certified along with scnp certified. My question is will this pay off? Can anyone with these certs tell me how it worked out for you. Thanks

ANYONE OUT THERE????

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Well, as I see it, you can learn a lot while fullfilling your Cert requirements, or you can learn nothing. If learning is your goal, then the riggors of achieving certification will definetly help you. My customers really never ask me about my certifications, but they are all happy that I know what I know. One of the problems with NOT going through the certification process is simply that you don't know what you don't know. I don't remember where I first heard that, but the person was dead on. The certification processes that I have been through, force you to look into the nooks and crannys of things that you might otherwise have only paid casual or no attention to. It's worth the trouble, but it's not a magic bullet. You will have to do the work and then prove that you can actually think and put it to use in the marketplace.

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oops...forgot to sign in....

i have a A+ took it the last day before it changed over to include linux. Now i think i don't have to re-take it.

would like to do other things other in IT other than fix pc's as a p/t hobby...not sure where to start.... :cool:

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Well, as I see it, you can learn a lot while fullfilling your Cert requirements, or you can learn nothing. If learning is your goal, then the riggors of achieving certification will definetly help you. My customers really never ask me about my certifications, but they are all happy that I know what I know. One of the problems with NOT going through the certification process is simply that you don't know what you don't know. I don't remember where I first heard that, but the person was dead on. The certification processes that I have been through, force you to look into the nooks and crannys of things that you might otherwise have only paid casual or no attention to. It's worth the trouble, but it's not a magic bullet. You will have to do the work and then prove that you can actually think and put it to use in the marketplace.

Thanks for the info, just out of curiosity what field are you working in?

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i know the A+ isnt anything to brag about, but here i am. I didnt have to pay for the class, i just sign up for it. The cost of the certification test is only like $50, and if i pass they give back $30.

CISM
CISA
CISSP

Well the cost of my CISSP was worth it. If you're going to study for the CISSP, most of study books are useless.
The CISSP Prep guide is garbage. My old roommate had it, and although it is an excellent resouce book, it is a poor tool for preparing for the exam.

CISSP is geard toward consulting and not technical knowledge. Know how your encryption formats are used, not how they work. Don't worry about specific laws or HIPAA stuff as the book goes on and on about... only a few such questions are on the test and then tend to be logical and requiring no specific knowledge, same for other specific standards or guidelines.

Just know how technologies, policies, and standards are intended to be used and you will pass with flying colors.

catch

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