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im alredy 24, want to make career in computer,if u ask me to rate myself in computer proficiancy on 1-10 scale it comes 1.
i have planned a 3yrs degree course named MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATION but i want some speciallity plese help.

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Last Post by sfbell
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im alredy 24, want to make career in computer,if u ask me to rate myself in computer proficiancy on 1-10 scale it comes 1.
i have planned a 3yrs degree course named MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATION but i want some speciallity plese help.

When starting out a career you should consider a couple of items.
1. Do you want to focus on hardware or software?
2. Do you want to specialize in a particular subset of #1?
3. Are you willing to sacrifice specialization in one or two areas to have a broader base of skills?

An example for hardware may be server administration, focusing on security. For software, maybe something like .NET focusing on web applications.

I have found it very useful to have a broad base of skills, which allows me to be very flexible in finding a solution to a given task/project.

However, the downside of that is less practical experience in any given skill because of distributing my time over so many. Just to demonstrate, my software skills cover Perl, Python, Java, C#, PHP, and ColdFusion. Not to mention Html, javascript and other associated technologies. I have been programming professionally for 2 years, but if I were to break down time spent on the languages it would be something like: Perl 5%, Python 3%, PHP 2%, ColdFusion 15%, Java 25%, C# 50%.

So, here I am with a broad base of skills, but if I go for a job against someone who has focused their time on one, odds are if the job is specific to one language, I will not get it because I have less practical time in the language.

I will say this: When it comes to a technology career, it really helps to love this stuff. I could seriously (and have on more than one occasion) spend a normal work day programming, then go home and program for several more hours. Embrace the Tech culture and enjoy what you do!

:p

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Very good info, I'm also 24 and just started in the IT field. I spent yrs in buisness managment, and hated it. I love my job now though. My skills are very broad and I'm still learning so I don't have any real specialties, but i'll spend all day fixing problems, only to go home and fix more, or research something I couldn't finish at work. I never stop, but thats good for me. I can't learn enough.

This change in my career was hard but well worth it, if you got questions on how I got here reply and i'll see if my experiences can help you.

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hi,
i have read ur reply to sayyed mudassar.
even my dillema is near about same,you have given three considerations i would like to answer it so please guide me.

1.i am intrested in software
2.i want a specialization
3.a specialization with broder base of skills.

plz help me if u can.

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hi,
i have read ur reply to sayyed mudassar.
even my dillema is near about same,you have given three considerations i would like to answer it so please guide me.

1.i am intrested in software
2.i want a specialization
3.a specialization with broder base of skills.

plz help me if u can.

Lets go a bit deeper then.

Are you currently working in software, or is this an area you wish to enter?
Did you have something in mind like desktop application development, server development, web development?

Microsoft .NET is in demand, particularly visual basic or VB.NET. It's pretty easy to pickup and learn. It would give you the flexibility of learning a language that can be applied to both web and desktop. However, only learning that would be fairly specialized, because you would be constrained to Microsoft Windows operating system for the most part. There is a project called Mono, that brings the .NET specification to Linux, Macintosh, and Unix platforms. (But that's a different story altogether.)

I would suggest starting with 1 Microsoft language and 1 cross-platform language (Java, Python, Perl, C, C++ etc..) Then start looking at filling your own needs with them. This serves as a good base to practice your skills. Another thing you can do is check online for small projects, places such as rentacoder.com. This will allow you to start building resume quality experience, as you will be faced with projects with deadlines, programming constraints, and of course, the dreaded CUSTOMER. LOL.

I feel that working in the web development arena lends itself to greater flexibility and broader skills. On a daily basis I have to know how to adminster a web server, admin a database server, understand networking, file IO, maintain security and protect the integrity of the network and systems that my software will come into contact with, and at the same time build a web application that is stable and provides my customer with their requirements.

One other skill/item that you must have, and that is paramount in software development, is personal integrity/Ethics. You need to be able to foster excellent working relationships with your customer, with members of your team, and management. You do this by not overstating your abilities just to get a project, by delivering your project on time, and in a very stable condition.

Of course I miss deadlines sometimes, but I make sure that if I have to miss a deadline that: A) There was nothing I could do to prevent it. B) That those affected by it are told with enough notice. and C) I attempt to minimize the impact.

I hope this helps.

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thnk u for giving me so quick reply.

i m gonna study suggestions given by u. i m just a bigginer,i have included u in my buddy list so that as i need your help i can send u a private message, can i:?:

i will mail u after i get answer to all questions raised by your reply.thanku once again

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