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Hi,

I'm new to this forum and I'm really interested in futhering my education into computer technologies.

I'm starting school again...and I don't like talking to my school counselor because I always get the feeling that they don't want to really spend their time giving me a hand or don't really know the answers.

What I'm interested in finding out is what trends are popping up in computer work and what type of programming / demands are on the rise. I know that IT professionals are going to be in high demand, so I'm considering this field.

My problem is I don't know where to start. What programs are essential to learn and what should I look into?

Thanks alot and again, any help is much appreciated,

Marty:mrgreen:

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Last Post by MartinGM1983
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Hi,

I'm new to this forum and I'm really interested in futhering my education into computer technologies.

I'm starting school again...and I don't like talking to my school counselor because I always get the feeling that they don't want to really spend their time giving me a hand or don't really know the answers.

What I'm interested in finding out is what trends are popping up in computer work and what type of programming / demands are on the rise. I know that IT professionals are going to be in high demand, so I'm considering this field.

My problem is I don't know where to start. What programs are essential to learn and what should I look into?

Thanks alot and again, any help is much appreciated,

Marty:mrgreen:

If you take a look at any recruitment websites or papers, you'll get a list of 'buzz' words as long as your arm: ASP, SQL, Java, XML, Cisco, MCSE... to name but a few! Along with typical applications (MS Office suite, project management software, etc), as well as something along the lines of "Educated to degree level or equivalent", or otherwise pointing to potential candidates with a strong mathematical/science background .

Having a list of 3-letter acronyms in your CV, and a BSc after your name generally looks good on paper, but in an interview situation for any job, most employers will be trying to ascertain not just your knowledge on a your chosen area of IT, but just as importantly, your enthusiasm about it. When you decide what to study, you should think long and hard about whether you actually want to do that thing for a living - Employers know all too well what happens after 18 months when someone they've hired doesn't enjoy their job - and they'll avoid these people at all cost!

Aside from showing employers your interest in your chosen subject, there's nothing worse than choosing to study something just because you think you should - only do it because you want to!

On an end note - another quality which employers look for, is 'people' skills.. and I don't mean just written/verbal communication, interview skills, presentation skills, etc (Although those are valuable too!), Sometimes the ability to engage with other people appears to be an art completely lost among some 'IT people'.

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Thank's for the helping hand. I've done some reading and I think I should just start at the very bottom of programming languages. I just bought the most simplistic book I could find and decided that I will read as much as I can until I find something that absorbs me.

Thanks again.

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