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I've noticed a ton of questions asking about different degrees and college decisions in general. I figured the questions have been brought up enough to have a dedicated thread for the subject.

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I am really confused about what I should do after my BS. I'm currently working towards a BS in Comp. Sci. and have a few roads to choose from. I want to be the IT Director/Network Administrator for a company with multiple offices. I currently work for such a company, and I seem to be impressing the right people that could potentially lead me to such a job after my degree.

The first option I have is to go for my Masters, but I'm not sure what to get. I definitely want to get a Masters in something but I have been given different opinions, all from trusted people. The first I have is to go for my MCST (Masters in Computer Science and Information Technology). I had actually made plans for the college I want to attend for this degree. But later, I was told (by someone working in the field) that I should get my MBA? Which would do me better? I mean, I know getting my MBA would pretty much throw me into supervisor status but I want to be a hands-on guy too. Wouldn't a MCST benefit me more for doing something like this? How are masters degrees looked at by hiring officers?

Another avenue I have looked at is getting my CCIE. I will (hopefully) be a CCNP at the end of my BS. I would like to take time to study for my CCIE exam, but I was told (by the guy working in the field) that it would be a lot like a doctor. If something goes wrong anywhere, you're the first one they call. I would like that in most situations because it would give me a feeling of importance, but I'm sure after a while I can see how it would become annoying.

Also, I am curious as to how the pay will vary. And if I will be over-qualified if I do both the masters and the CCIE? Will I have a hard time finding a job that will be looking for someone with these credentials? What about PHDs? If I have no interest in teaching/research until my 50s should I even consider this?

lots of questions here. thanks for help with any of them!!

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Last Post by Duki
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why do plain comp/sci when you can do a degree in networking?

most unis over here let you study for a degree in networking whilst getting you a cisco type certification. You also get a work placement on mos tcourses (sandwich style)

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Look at degrees in IT or information systems (I think) if you're going to continue with school. And the CCIE is great to wave around and get you started. But here's the catch: the people in industry value experience over anything. A friend of mine is a network engineer at Microsoft, and I have more certifications than he does (CCNA, whoop dee do, and it expires next month). On the other hand, the guy knows his stuff, probably as good as most CCIEs in whatever he does (since the CCIE does have specializations...). As I recall, his degree is in physics or something; his credentials are based on experience. And that's what'll make the difference in the long run. I doubt you'd need a PhD at all, short of research. And you probably don't want to spend the time or money to get one at this point.

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why do plain comp/sci when you can do a degree in networking?

most unis over here let you study for a degree in networking whilst getting you a cisco type certification. You also get a work placement on mos tcourses (sandwich style)

Well the school I'm going to only offers a comp sci program. I would love to get a networking degree, though that makes me very 'area specific'. That's why I'm leaning towards IT since it's somewhat generalized, but will allow me to specialize in certain areas as well.

The degree program I'm in now allows for a focus in networking which is the path I'm taking. I take 9 Cisco classes throughout my degree program, each with an accompanying lab.

Look at degrees in IT or information systems (I think) if you're going to continue with school. And the CCIE is great to wave around and get you started. But here's the catch: the people in industry value experience over anything. A friend of mine is a network engineer at Microsoft, and I have more certifications than he does (CCNA, whoop dee do, and it expires next month). On the other hand, the guy knows his stuff, probably as good as most CCIEs in whatever he does (since the CCIE does have specializations...). As I recall, his degree is in physics or something; his credentials are based on experience. And that's what'll make the difference in the long run. I doubt you'd need a PhD at all, short of research. And you probably don't want to spend the time or money to get one at this point.

I'm currently the IT manager for my branch. The company is called Thrasher Engineering. Anyways, they have 5 offices total, and we're getting ready to implement a new WAN infrastructure along with VoIP. I'm trying every way I can to get my hands into this project, and I'm fairly certain I'll gain good ex points from it. I currently have 1.5yrs IT exp.

I've always heard exp is most desired but some companies will actually prefer a cert before a degree.

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Well let me clarify. The company only has ~15 staff and I only work about 12hrs a week. But I'm the head IT in a department of 2 people lol.

They're giving me a lot more to do though, especially since we're implementing this new project.. they've let me make a lot of the decisions as far as what technologies and which vendors to go with.

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I'm currently the IT manager for my branch. The company is called Thrasher Engineering. Anyways, they have 5 offices total, and we're getting ready to implement a new WAN infrastructure along with VoIP. I'm trying every way I can to get my hands into this project, and I'm fairly certain I'll gain good ex points from it. I currently have 1.5yrs IT exp.

I've always heard exp is most desired but some companies will actually prefer a cert before a degree.

That sounds great. Especially if you're getting a CCNP. Things like implementng the new infrastructure should be mentioned somehow in your resume. Other than than, I don't really know much about what to expect or how best to proceed. Sounds like you're definitely on the right track at least.

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That sounds great. Especially if you're getting a CCNP. Things like implementng the new infrastructure should be mentioned somehow in your resume. Other than than, I don't really know much about what to expect or how best to proceed. Sounds like you're definitely on the right track at least.

well... that's encouraging. thanks

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