0

I am a HSI/DSL subscriber. My Windows XP Networks Connections window says my connection speed is 100Mbps. Lately, 6-minute-playback-time videos that normally download quickly enough (usually less than a minute) to be viewed uninterrupted [that is the loading progression bar (that slides along the bottom of the video display window) moves faster than the playback pointer] as they are downloaded now take 10-15 minutes to completely download even at 2 AM. In other words, as of late, the playback pointer quickly overtakes the sliding download bar (the movie pauses) and I have to wait a long time before I can view the video uninterrupted.

What possible factors/causes affect video download speed?

  • defective DSL modem?
  • defective Internet Service Provider?
  • Windows registry needs “cleaning”?
  • Hard drive needs defrag?
  • Special settings are needed to be made to Windows Explorer or browser add-ons as Adobe Flash players to maximize speed performance?
  • the website I am downloading the video from is “slow”?
  • other reasons?


How do I diagnose video download speed problems? Can I take the speed issue up with my ISP? Is there a way to configure my computer for the fastest downloads and best video performance possible? In terms of video downloading performance and cars, my same PC is acting like a “Volkswagen Bus”, not the “slick Porsche 9-11 Twin Turbo” as it used to.:sad:

2
Contributors
6
Replies
9
Views
10 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by jonmyrlebailey
0

My Windows XP Networks Connections window says my connection speed is 100Mbps.

It's important to remember that when it says "100 Mpbs", that's only the speed from the computer to the modem. Your actual download speed it dependant usually on your ISP.

From what I can tell, it's unlikely that the problem is hardware-related. Usually even the most bogged-down computer is slower than the regular download speed given to you by your ISP. Some things I would try:

  • Try downloading from another website. After all, it's very likely that this particular website has been bogged down from traffic.
  • Check the actual download speeds on large files. If this is consistently below the bandwidth you should be getting, it's likely a ISP problem (especially if it occurs at all hours of the day).
  • If it's possible, try testing the internet connection with another computer (or moving your PC to another internet connection).

Hope this helps

0

I do not know about my ISP protocols, bandwidth or bittorrents, but it seems as my DSL modem is a defective product that overheats, causes static on the telephone line and disconnects involuntarilly during surfing sessions. My ISP (phone company) is shipping me a replacement DSL modem. I think connectivity should improve as well as video download speeds with the new modem. I will stay tuned. :sad:

0

To make this easier, I'm going to answer your PMs and your latest post all in one. :)

Well, if the modem is overheating and causing static on telephone lines, I'd say it's definitely your modem. (Although static on telephone lines can also be due to lousy microfilters.) I haven't tried very many DSL modems, but the one I'm currently using is the best so far: the Linksys ADSL Modem. It's proven very reliable and was painless to setup. Even if your ISP does not give it out free, it may be worth going out of your way to buy it, since Linksys is a very reliable brand.

As for figuring out the bandwidth you're getting, go to a site that has a very fast server, and hosts large files. The best I can think of is the Slackware download mirrors site. Pick a fast mirror, and download the file. You don't even have to complete the download, just watch the download window on your browser and see what speed it reports. Just remember to multiply by 8 to get your ISP's bandwidth (they advertise in xxx-bits, your browser reports it in xxx-bytes).

For example, I see a 190 kb/s download. Multiply by 8, and I get 1.5 megabits - the bandwidth that I'm paying for.

0

To make this easier, I'm going to answer your PMs and your latest post all in one. :)

Well, if the modem is overheating and causing static on telephone lines, I'd say it's definitely your modem. (Although static on telephone lines can also be due to lousy microfilters.) I haven't tried very many DSL modems, but the one I'm currently using is the best so far: the Linksys ADSL Modem. It's proven very reliable and was painless to setup. Even if your ISP does not give it out free, it may be worth going out of your way to buy it, since Linksys is a very reliable brand.

As for figuring out the bandwidth you're getting, go to a site that has a very fast server, and hosts large files. The best I can think of is the Slackware download mirrors site. Pick a fast mirror, and download the file. You don't even have to complete the download, just watch the download window on your browser and see what speed it reports. Just remember to multiply by 8 to get your ISP's bandwidth (they advertise in xxx-bits, your browser reports it in xxx-bytes).

For example, I see a 190 kb/s download. Multiply by 8, and I get 1.5 megabits - the bandwidth that I'm paying for.

I have tried a different microfilter on my telephone line: this did not cancel the noise.

I went to slackware to download a mirror. My dialog box says the transfer rate is "156KB/Sec." Is this notation kilobytes per second or kilobits per second? I thought "KB" capital letters stood for Kilobytes.

If KB is kilobits, and I multiply it by 8, then I guess my ISP bandwidth
is: 1.248 megabits.

0

I have tried a different microfilter on my telephone line: this did not cancel the noise.

Well, then I'd say there's some sort of problem with your DSL modem.

I went to slackware to download a mirror. My dialog box says the transfer rate is "156KB/Sec." Is this notation kilobytes per second or kilobits per second? I thought "KB" capital letters stood for Kilobytes.

Yes, it will be in kilobytes. It's a silly advertising trick that these ISPs do; they always use "bits" so they can advertise a bandwidth like "1.5 Megabits". This is fine, until you try to actually compare it with download speeds reported by your browser. Every web browser I've used reports the download speeds in bytes/kilobytes/megabytes.

If KB is kilobits, and I multiply it by 8, then I guess my ISP bandwidth
is: 1.248 megabits.

Correct, and that's actually a typical download speed for me. However, you've failed to mention what your expected bandwidth is. Are you paying for a 1.5 megabit connection? 5? 8? If it's only a 1.5 megabit connection, 1.2 is actually quite acceptable. However, if you're paying for much higher bandwidth, you should definitely try a different modem.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.