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It's been known for a while that current and potential future employers look at people's profiles on social networking sites such as Facebook.

And it's also been known that people are using social networking sites to announce the status of their relationship -- or lack of one.

Now the two uses are getting together, with divorce attorneys mining social networking sites for evidence supporting their clients.

"Lawyers, however, love these sites, which can be evidentiary gold mines," said a recent article in Time. "Did your husband's new girlfriend Twitter about getting a piece of jewelry? The court might regard that as marital assets being disbursed to a third party. Did your wife tell the court she's incapable of getting a job? Then your lawyer should ask why she's pursuing job interviews through LinkedIn." One attorney quoted in the article said such research is "routine."

In addition, exes are posting information about their formers -- such as an estranged wife emailing "friends" of the spouse the additional information that he was married with children, which he had neglected to include in his Facebook profile.

Such messages on a social-networking site can even be part of a harassment campaign that led to the court's issuing a civil order of protection, one attorney said.

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Last Post by MktgRob
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Yes, the user generated content material on social media is a gold mine for any type of research. My colleague research new members of the team. My friend research potential dates, etc, etc, etc. Thus, for divorce, there are not only monetary but also emotional painful ties, so for many divorcees, the attitude is "Let's get him!!!" with the kindly help of their attorney. So social media provides the landscape to enable this mission.

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The old axiom used to be "Be careful what you put in writing". It would seem the 21st century version will be "Be careful what you..." followed by tweet, post to facebook, post to youtube, etc.

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