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hi all,
i 'm reading this page about pagerank :

www webworkshop net/pagerank html
-- hey canadian,i didn't link above address to real page,just paste the url --

here is written about 'Site PageRank' and 'Page PageRank'.
but i don't get the importance of Site PageRank. what for is it?

Edited by canadafred: hyperkink removed but distinguishable

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Last Post by StevenCashman
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i also want to know the same.
also i want to know that what is the difference between "Site page rank and Page pagerank"?

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i also want to know the same.
also i want to know that what is the difference between "Site page rank and Page pagerank"?

There is no such thing as 'site pagerank.' Instead, think of your website in pages. The homepage is separate from and internal page and is therefor ranked differently.

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There is no such thing as 'site pagerank.' Instead, think of your website in pages. The homepage is separate from and internal page and is therefor ranked differently.

let say an example:
i have search for example 'apple' in Google. it shows my site in 3th position.the page it shows from my site is for example ' mysite.com/about-apple.html ' .
this page has PR5. but the pages above my position in SERP both have lower PR,one PR2, one PR4.
i think my PR is important in my position in SERP,but what i see i different.
i guess mybe tatol site page rank(or total site rank) is playing role here and those site above me,have higher site rank.
umm... i don't know,i am really get confused.
what is your idea?

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hummm............
i have found something which seems reasonable about my previous post.
here it is :
"
To explain this concept without going into too much technical detail, it is best to think of PageRank as being comprised of two different values. One value, which we'll call "General PageRank" is nothing more than the weighting given to the links on your page. This is also the value shown in the Google Toolbar. This value is used to calculate the weighting of the links leaving your page, not your search position.

The other value we'll call "Specific PageRank." You see, if PageRank equated to search engine results rank then Yahoo, the site with the highest PR, would be listed #1 for every search result. Obviously, that wouldn't be useful, so what Google does is examine the context of your incoming links, and only those links that relate to the specific keyword being searched on will help you achieve a higher ranking for that keyword. It's very possible for a site with a lower PageRank to in fact have more on-topic incoming links than a site with a higher PageRank, in which case the site with a lower PageRank will be listed above its competitor in the search results for that term.
"

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hummm............
i have found something which seems reasonable about my previous post.
here it is :
"
To explain this concept without going into too much technical detail, it is best to think of PageRank as being comprised of two different values. One value, which we'll call "General PageRank" is nothing more than the weighting given to the links on your page. This is also the value shown in the Google Toolbar. This value is used to calculate the weighting of the links leaving your page, not your search position.

The other value we'll call "Specific PageRank." You see, if PageRank equated to search engine results rank then Yahoo, the site with the highest PR, would be listed #1 for every search result. Obviously, that wouldn't be useful, so what Google does is examine the context of your incoming links, and only those links that relate to the specific keyword being searched on will help you achieve a higher ranking for that keyword. It's very possible for a site with a lower PageRank to in fact have more on-topic incoming links than a site with a higher PageRank, in which case the site with a lower PageRank will be listed above its competitor in the search results for that term.
"

Nice explanation, i've learnt something that is new and really useful to me through this post.

Edited by ljianyih: n/a

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