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So my new Asus UX305 has just arrived. I charged the battery till full and I'm now using the laptop. I'm planning to switch it off very soon, and then it occurred to me, do I have to break in the battery, or can I just use it as normal (meaning use it till it reaches 40-50% and then plug it in?). Just to clarify, by "break in" they mean like run a full discharge and then recharge cycle at least 3-4 times
I looked up on the net about breaking in the battery but there isn't too much from authoritative sources
Any advice is of course appreciated
thanks

Edited by Violet_82

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Last Post by Violet_82
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I'm going with no. LiON and such batteries do not need breakin or such schenagins. I guess if you want to wear out a battery like that, go right ahead.

Here, only use the battery when I have to and not because it has a battery. These are still 300 cycle devices (we can but won't hold a long discussion about what 300 means.)

So here, I set it to battery saver mode, which charges to 80% and then use my laptop. There are folk that remove the battery, refrigerate it and more to "save the battery." Here I get years out of a battery with my oldest laptop over 10 years old and the battery gets me over 50% of when it was new. Which is fantastic compared to folk that worked far harder than I did.

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Right, so I'll switch it off and then on again when I need it.
Is it good practice to then connect to the main the laptop again when the battery reaches 40-50%? Some say that it is better for the battery itself. One more thing, this laptop is not the main one, so it will be likely to be off for most of the week. I'm not into that kind of do-everything-you-can-to-save-the-battery person, but still, if there are simply things I can do to make sure that my battery lasts as long as I can I'm happy to do it. This laptop doesn't have a removable battery though, hopefully it will be OK. In the meanwhile, I will set the battery to balanced mode too, as it is on high performance now

Edited by Violet_82

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That's news to me. Here I get years out of laptop batteries and I never did any of what you wrote.

I don't see the full make and model so I can't check if it has the battery life extension feature. That feature to me was just what we needed for folk that worry about battery life span.

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Nice enough PC. For this one you plug it in and the battery charges up and you use the laptop. All battery operations are fully automatic and can really upset folk that want to control it all. It's just another Lithium battery, not subject to the issues of NiCAD and NiMH.

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Cool, but does the notion that you shouldn't let the battery discharge below 40/50% and then connect it to the main still hold true?

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I hold no such notion. While I fretted about this in the NiCad and NiMH days, today I won't lose any sleep over this. You will find folk fretting on and on and there's little you can do for them.

Plug in, enjoy the machine. If it offers the battery life extender, use it.

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