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:'( Im not sure if its ok to ask for help here sorry alittle new to this but im having a problem with my comp i ran a virus scan of my comp all it found was one adware so it removed it and restarted my comp but now i have no taskbar and no icons so i tried ctrl+alt+del but nothing worked so next i tried safe mode but that also didnt work so would i need to reinstall xp which i dont have the disc to:( or reformat which i dont know how to do as im not to bright when it comes to this sort of thing or I was offerd to buy a wondows Emergency Rescue Disc would that even be worth trying?? please can someone give me alittle help with this

TY

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Last Post by guybo
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Please try doing System restore to a date earlier than the date when you ran the viru scan...
it will solve your problem

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Please try doing System restore to a date earlier than the date when you ran the viru scan...
it will solve your problem

I do not think so. System restore is not a panacea for all things on ones pc.

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If the problem is a virus and it gets access to the restore file this little issue can worsen greatly. I recommend turning system restore off before doing any major virus hunting or removal to prevent damaging restore files. Only after fixing the proble do you want to turn it back on.

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If the problem is a virus and it gets access to the restore file this little issue can worsen greatly. I recommend turning system restore off before doing any major virus hunting or removal to prevent damaging restore files. Only after fixing the proble do you want to turn it back on.

And then you are left with zero restore points if/when things go wrong.
An infected restore point is better than no restore point.

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I prefer not to feed the infections in my network any fresh files. Once a system restore file is damaged it almost always ends in a re-image. But it is all a matter of how hard you want to work i guess.

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If you have no restore points to fall back on and something goes wrong whilst trying to remove the infection, there are then limited options left to you.
A reformat/repair comes to mind.
We do not recommend turning off system restore until confident that the pc is back to normal.

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If you are back to normal and rely on your system restore to get you there then why turn it off at all? Don't get me wrong i see what you are saying i just don't think that accessing restore while infected is a good idea. I don't even enable system restore on my workstations. It is also not enabled in my master image. N-E-WAYZ Just giving my ideas same as the rest but the user should always be comfortable with what they are doing or not do it at all.

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:'( Im not sure if its ok to ask for help here sorry alittle new to this but im having a problem with my comp i ran a virus scan of my comp all it found was one adware so it removed it and restarted my comp but now i have no taskbar and no icons so i tried ctrl+alt+del but nothing worked so next i tried safe mode but that also didnt work so would i need to reinstall xp which i dont have the disc to:( or reformat which i dont know how to do as im not to bright when it comes to this sort of thing or I was offerd to buy a wondows Emergency Rescue Disc would that even be worth trying?? please can someone give me alittle help with this

TY

An emergency bootable Windows Rescue CD or DVD allows you to do the following:
•Boot a working Windows system from a CD/DVD even when your entire hard disk or computer system is unbootable. Depending on the programs you place on the bootable Windows rescue CD, you can even surf the Internet, view/display powerpoint slides, write basic ASCII text files, burn CDs, etc, in that system. It will be excruciatingly slow though (since it will be running from a CD and not a high speed hard disk), but in an emergency, it may be just what you need to get work done even when your entire system has crashed.

•Recover data from a hard disk that can no longer boot - for example, you can copy your important files from that hard disk to a floppy disk or flash drive even if you can no longer boot into Windows from the disk. You can also run file and data recovery software to undelete files that you have accidentally deleted. Running such programs from a bootable Windows rescue CD environment is safer because the running Windows system will not overwrite the space previously occupied by your already deleted files (unless you specifically write files there).

•Scan the hard disk for viruses and remove spyware, trojans and other malware that elude your antivirus software when Windows is loaded. Sometimes, viruses, trojans and other malware are embedded so tightly into your operating system that when you boot Windows the normal way, the virus is also loaded and cannot be detected or removed by antivirus software running in that system. In such a case, you might want to start up Windows from a clean source like a bootable Windows rescue CD and scan the hard disk from there.

•Defragment files on a hard disk that cannot be defragmented when Windows is loaded from the hard disk. The emergency Windows boot CD that you create here will have the default Windows defragmentation utility. However, booting from the CD will allow you to defragment certain files on your hard disk that you normally will not be able to defragment, like the page file, hibernation file, etc. (Note: though, that one or more of the utilities like UltimateDefrag will allow you to do this even without an emergency boot disk.)

•Backup and restore your hard disk from an environment that will not interfere with the backup or restoration process. While most modern backup and imaging programs will allow you to backup a system even when it is running, they often require you to reboot to an emergency disk to restore the system disk.

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If you are back to normal and rely on your system restore to get you there then why turn it off at all? Don't get me wrong i see what you are saying i just don't think that accessing restore while infected is a good idea. I don't even enable system restore on my workstations. It is also not enabled in my master image. N-E-WAYZ Just giving my ideas same as the rest but the user should always be comfortable with what they are doing or not do it at all.

The idea of leaving it enabled is as explained. Once we are happy that the pc is behaving normally again, we then advice the user to disable/enable the system restore so that the possibility of an infection residing there is eliminated.

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How to use System Restore to restore Windows XP to a previous state
Note To perform System Restore, you must be logged on to Windows as an administrator. If this is your personal computer, you are likely already logged on with an administrator account. If this is a computer that is part of a network at work, you might have to ask the system administrator for help. To verify that you are logged on to Windows with a user account that is a computer administrator, visit the following Microsoft Web site:
http://support.microsoft.com/gp/admin (http://support.microsoft.com/gp/admin)
To use System Restore to restore Windows XP to a previous state, follow these steps:

1. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
2. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Restore. System Restore starts.
3. On the Welcome to System Restore page, click Restore my computer to an earlier time (if it is not already selected), and then click Next.
4. On the Select a Restore Point page, click the most recent system restore point in the On this list, click a restore point list, and then click Next.

Note A System Restore message may appear that lists configuration changes that System Restore will make. Click OK.
5. On the Confirm Restore Point Selection page, click Next. System Restore restores the previous Windows XP configuration, and then restarts the computer.
6. Log on to the computer as Administrator. The System Restore Restoration Complete page is displayed.
7. Click OK.

If you successfully restored your computer to a previous state, and the computer is performing as it should be, you are finished.

If the restore process completed successfully but the computer is still not performing as you want, go to the "How to undo a system restoration after you perform a System Restore" section. If you received an error message and the restore process did not finish, or if you cannot run System Restore, go to the "Next Steps" section.

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