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Is there any way that I can install Linux on my desktop that have windows already(corrupted don't work), without loosing my data on drives.
I have 160 GB hard in it and C:\ has windows but now I want that my windows drive is replaced with Linux and D:\, E:\ and F:\ don't disturbed, because the data is very important.

Any suggestions.

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Last Post by Jakkals
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Yeah if your drive is already partitioned or they are actually seperate hard drives then it shouldn't be a problem.
Ubuntu for example has a very easy disk management tool that it runs before you start installing, just pay attention to what you are doing.

Other distros often offer similar tools so just take a look at it, I haven't seen a distro yet that just deletes all partitions and takes over all your hard disks without asking you what you want first.

But do be careful because mistakes are easily made ;)

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Yeah if your drive is already partitioned or they are actually seperate hard drives then it shouldn't be a problem.
Ubuntu for example has a very easy disk management tool that it runs before you start installing, just pay attention to what you are doing.

Other distros often offer similar tools so just take a look at it, I haven't seen a distro yet that just deletes all partitions and takes over all your hard disks without asking you what you want first.

But do be careful because mistakes are easily made ;)

I have one Hard disk which have four partitions and I want to use drive C:\ for installation. Now I have Ubuntu dvd but I'm confused what to do, or if it don't format all drives, at least I want to know, its logical that 1 hard disk which is partitioned and formatted with windows before now if I'll successful to install on C:\ then Linux would be able to address other drives too, on them I have data.

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Just make sure of the partitioning on installation. Only reformat the first partition (which, if I read it correctly) is currently drive C:\. NOTE: You will need a swap partition. Make the swap parition about twice the size of your RAM. When you get to the the poiny in the installation where the diskpartitioning is done, select the 'manual' option, delete the first partition, then recreate two new partitions on that drive. You will also need to create a swapspace within that same space. Select '/' as mountpoint for the first partition. A word of caution: There is a limit of 4 partitions that you can create on a drive including the swapspace.

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Just make sure of the partitioning on installation. Only reformat the first partition (which, if I read it correctly) is currently drive C:\. NOTE: You will need a swap partition. Make the swap parition about twice the size of your RAM. When you get to the the poiny in the installation where the diskpartitioning is done, select the 'manual' option, delete the first partition, then recreate two new partitions on that drive. You will also need to create a swapspace within that same space. Select '/' as mountpoint for the first partition. A word of caution: There is a limit of 4 partitions that you can create on a drive including the swapspace.

How to swap partitions? And could you tell me, what to do? You told that there is a limit of partitions not more than 4, then when I have already 4 partitions how I can make another for swapping.

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I think you understand 'swap partition' wrong. It has nothing to do with partition 'swapping'. A 'swap partition' is a physical partition on your hdd which Linux uses as virtual RAM.
Almost all distro's of Linux supports various kinds of filesystems. The 'ext3 journalling'- and 'ReiserFS'-filesystems are just two examples. The 'swap'-filesystem is a third. If u already have 4 filesystems you might try to boot from a liveCD, mount the filesystems, do a backup & reorg of your current config and then proceed with installation.
I have a couple of articles available on Filesystem Management and am most willing to post an appropriate one here.
I you could indicate which version of Ubuntu you have and give me some idea as to your Linux-experience I will be happy to oblige.
Regards

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..... I haven't seen a distro yet that just deletes all partitions and takes over all your hard disks without asking you what you want first.

But do be careful because mistakes are easily made ;)

Careful! - 'SME Server 7.x' (maybe older releases as well) does exactly that. :-/
Ditto on the last sentence.

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How to swap partitions? And could you tell me, what to do? You told that there is a limit of partitions not more than 4, then when I have already 4 partitions how I can make another for swapping.

There is a limit of 4 primary partitions, if you create a logical partition out of the C:\ partition and then split that into / and swap you should be fine too

Careful! - 'SME Server 7.x' (maybe older releases as well) does exactly that.

Wow dude, that's crazy :-O

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I you could indicate which version of Ubuntu you have and give me some idea as to your Linux-experience I will be happy to oblige.
Regards

Ubuntu 8.10
NR28 REC3098148 ubuntu D5453:1 CN kubuntu D5454:0 ubuntu server D5455:0 D5456:0 45.5 P11433:1 X17423:0 TOKEN:fj3j7cr32c P8506:0 Rest of World NLMM01

I hope you got idea which version I have, well my experience is zero in the Linux. I never used it but I heard that this is the most advance and dramatic OS in the world, normally for the Geeks or the people who want to explore their computer from root. This is what I know.

Thanks for your help

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First things first. I see that Ubuntu has 9.04 ready for download. No use starting with the older stuff. I have to do a little homework & preparation first. Then will edit the appropriate document.
Lastly I will publish a URL here where you can find the document.

Meantime you can download the Ubuntu 9.04 .iso-file from http://www.ubuntu.com. Once on the download-page, check 'Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop', scroll down & select a location, then croll down again (below the 'Begin Download'-button) and select whether you want the 32-bit or 64-bit edition.

While all this is going on do visit http://ubuntuforums.org - register and proceed with some reading. Its free, by the way. Get used to the idea - "It's FREE!"

Burn the .iso to a CD and boot from it. This gives u a fully functional desktop (without any changes to your machine) with which you can play and get acquainted. Once done you can simply shut the machine down and remove the CD.

Will have the document ready & published within the next 24-36 hours.
Enjoy! :)

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