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Hello everyone. I have limited experience at programming,have been using c and java for a few years. However i am a long time windows user. I recently got a serious assignment for university. I picked programming topic assuming it would be something i would know something about, however the topic was "task scheduling in linux". I am supposed to look into the way linux schedules services and tasks, and "tweek" with it a little bit. I have absolutely no idea where to start, and i don't know (due to my windows-only experience) how to dive in linux's open source goodies. If anyone could provide me with a few information on how to start, where to begin studying etc,it would be much appreciated.

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Last Post by rubberman
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Cron is the utility that schedules and runs tasks in almost all Linux distros.

crontab -l will list out current items.
crontab -e lets you edit your cron jobs.

There's really not much to improve. Cron is rock solid. Maybe a GUI for the interface would be a good project.

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Are you referring to Job Scheduling or CPU Scheduling?

For the former, there isn't much to say, it's what the cron tool does, and it isn't particularly challenging or involving any special algorithm or anything.

For the latter, however, what you'd want to look at is the Completely-Fair Scheduler and the Brain F$ck Scheduler. This is much more in-depth of a topic, it's the nerve-center of Linux. I would focus on that latter scheduler, if only for the opportunity to use the f-word repeatedly in a college paper.

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this is first time using linux and I want to create user interface ussing netbean7.3, I wish to you can give me a helping hand on how to start simple interface.

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As mentioned, task scheduling and job scheduling in Linux are very different beasts. Task scheduling is a kernel-level activity. Job scheduling is a function of the cron task. I suspect your project is task scheduling, so what Mike_2000 said goes. Linux encorporates a number of schedulers, from the default "Completely Fair Scheduler", to real-time schedulers that can handle priority inversions and such reasonably well. I think you have some serious studying to do! :-)

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