0

i am looking for intel video grahpics drivers in RED HAT ENTERPRISE LINUX 6, i want to use 3d features of Intel q963/q965 / GMA 3000 graphics in linux.
i have searched on www.intellinuxgraphics.org/ but could not find way to install them on my pc.
I also checked that Xorg X11 intel video drivers (2.14.0-1.el6 (x86_64) package is already installed.but how do i select the intel's video driver as my default driver.

i am beginner system administrator , not a programmer.

help will be appreciated.

many thanks.

4
Contributors
7
Replies
9
Views
6 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by rubberman
0

I have a similar video card (its the one that comes in core i3 - based laptops)

I couldn't get it to work under RHEL 6 when it was newly released but it worked out of the box in 6.1 - so maybe you should try to update?

0

Hello,

As I can see from your post, you need 3D graphics on RHEL?
I guess you can use a distro that supports graphics better like Ubuntu for example, as RHEL is designed for servers, and as you know servers doesn't require 3D effects

0

I have a similar video card (its the one that comes in core i3 - based laptops)

I couldn't get it to work under RHEL 6 when it was newly released but it worked out of the box in 6.1 - so maybe you should try to update?

The latest kernel for RHEL 6.0 is the same kernel as 6.1, so the video drivers should be the same. The current Xorg server will auto-detect the video hardware and load the appropriate driver without the old method of manually changing the xorg.conf file in /etc/X11. You can still use that method, but you need to know what you are doing.

0

Hello,

As I can see from your post, you need 3D graphics on RHEL?
I guess you can use a distro that supports graphics better like Ubuntu for example, as RHEL is designed for servers, and as you know servers doesn't require 3D effects

Wrong. Red hat isnt just for servers, it makes a very stable Workstation OS, and good development environment.

0

Wrong. Red hat isnt just for servers, it makes a very stable Workstation OS, and good development environment.

Indeed. I use SL (an RHEL clone) on my home workstation, personal laptop, and a lot of people use RHEL on their PCs where I work. We even have a customized version of RHEL that installs all of our security stuff and custom applications, so you can use them in place of Windows workstations. I'm thinking of doing that myself, but my new laptop/workstation has Windows 7 Enterprise on it and I want to get more familiar with that. Once I do so, I will switch back to Linux since I REALLY like it better! Right now at work I have it (RHEL 6.1) installed in a virtual machine, since I have to do Linux system development anyway.

0

Hello,

I didn't say RH doesn't work as a work station, I said it is designed for servers, and it is more commonly used as a server, for sure it will work on on a workstation.

Why I said it is not so common on desktop?
You have to register on RH network in order to be able to get repositories, and you will also get support, which companies prefer to have such support, that is why it is so common in servers.
If you want to use a RH clone, there are many Linux OS that are the same as RH, such as fedora, CentOS,SL (as posted by rubberman)...

And by the way, Linux can work anywhere, even on your toaster :)

0

The thing I like about RHEL and clones (I use SL at home, a Nokia-modified RHEL at work) is that it is built to be dead-bang reliable. We use it on a lot of software development workstations, and exclusively in our data centers. We have to service literally millions of users world-wide, so that is not an unimportant thing... :-) Yes, newer Linux distributions have more bells and whistles, but honestly I would not trade reliability for eye-candy. I am posting this on a Scientific Linux 6.x system (RHEL 6.x clone) and I only need to reboot it when I update the kernel. If I wasn't interested in all of the latest security "fixes", then I could reboot about once a year or even less frequently. I do audio/video processing, software development, embedded systems development (targeting ARM processors), Android development (using an Android phone emulator), Nokia S40 phone development (using Nokia emulator), email, accounting, and a lot of other stuff on this system. All of my software is FOSS (Free and Open Source) with two exceptions - my business Google Apps subscription, and subscription to an industrial strength virus scanner that I use to remove viruses and trojans from my clients' Windows systems.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.