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Hello Daniweb Users,

I just want to know when doing the command "df -lh" my /dev/sda1 got 100%

I do transfer some of the files but still it can be full any moment.

I have 438G size of hard disk. and 398G that has been used "said by the df -lh command"

So this is what I do to solve my problem:

I would like to track how can that be...

  1. cd / (I do go to the directory /)

  2. du -ch (every thing inside of this directory; home, bin, etc....etc..)

after doing this I just get a 3 item that has bigger in size (other have less 1gb)

  1. Home = 65G

  2. OPT = 4.6G

  3. USR = 4.3G

Am I doing it wrong? Please help or suggest what I can do to find things that make my disk full.

I just search for the internet is it maybe some ghost file in my machine?

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Last Post by Gribouillis
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A very simple thing to do is to launch a graphical disk usage analyser such as filelight or baobab.

Edited by Gribouillis

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Hello Sir Gribouillis,

I'm afraid I may not have the right to install software in our workstation.

Do I need to install this Graphical Disk Usage Analyser?

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You can type which baobab or which filelight first in a terminal to see if any of them is installed. Then launch the program as root.

Edited by Gribouillis

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There is a wierd issue with linux files systems it they ever are completely filled (0 bytes free). If you try deleting files to recover the space it does not show that there is space available. The trick is to find a file that you know you can get rid of and then instead of deleting the file cat /dev/null and redirect it to the file:
cat /dev/null > /home/mydir/some_file
The system is able to update the inode table with the smaller file size and it frees up the space and then you can start deleting files.
Since it sounds like you have already attempted to delete some files and it did not recover the space you need to run an fsck on the filesystem and let it correct the inode tables and disconnect the deleted files. Get in touch with your sysadmin and tell them you need fsck run on the root file system (normally what /dev/sda1 is).

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Hello Sir Griboullis,

I have the Baobab in my /usr/bin/baobab

Sir how I can run this baobab?

//--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------//

Hello Sir Rch1231,

When I backup some of the files and delete some of it.

It give space but the weird thing is why my disk is already full?

but I tried some thing like this:

  1. cd /

  2. du -ch (to all file of /)

and the result is 406g and I think it stop on its own because a message appear:

Message from syslogd@ at Thu May 12 16:19:46 2016 ...
tower05 kernel: journal commit I/O error

Correct me if I'm wrong, doing a du -ch in the path of "/" means checking the size of my linux?

I mean all the file inside of my linux?

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If you are a sudoer, try gksudo baobab in a terminal (or perhaps sudo -i baobab).

If you can't run it as root, you can perhaps try to run it from your user account (launch it like any other graphical program). It may not be able to analyse the full disk however.

Edited by Gribouillis

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Hello Sir,

I just type the sudo -i baobab

(baobab:14019): Gtk-WARNING **: cannot open display:

Any other way? using a console/terminal?

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